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HUMANITIES CALENDAR

In addition to organizing its own programming, the Baker-Nord Center for the Humanities supports and promotes humanities programming available throughout the Case Western Reserve University and Greater Cleveland community.  Below is the listing of upcoming humanities-related programming:


SEPTEMBER

 

English ImageClose Reading
September 1, 2017
3:15 pm
Guilford Parlor, 11112 Bellflower Road, Cleveland, OH  44106
Panel Discussion. Participants: Kim Emmons, Joshua Hoeynck, Maggie Vinter. Close reading is perhaps English’s most distinctive skill. Originally developed during the critical revolution of the early 20th century, close reading moved into the background during the rise of theory and historicism in the late 20th century. Yet it never lost its place at the center of how many of us teach and work. Recent years have seen a renewal of intellectual interest in the method. Coming from a range of positions within the field, our panelists reflect on the meaning and place of close reading today.

This event is sponsored by the CWRU Department of English and is free and open to the public.


The FortunesA Conversation with Peter Ho Davies
September 6, 2017
4:30 pm
Tinkham Veale University Center, 11038 Bellflower Road, Cleveland, OH  44106
This event features Peter Ho Davies, recipient of the 2017 Anisfield-Wolf Book Award for Fiction, in conversation with CWRU faculty members Thrity Umrigar and Lisa Nielson. Peter Ho Davies’ innovative novel, The Fortunes, examines the burdens, limitations and absurdities of Asian stereotypes.  In four linked sections, The Fortunes explores the California Gold Rush, actress Anna May Wong, the 1982 murder of Vincent Chin by a disgruntled Detroit autoworker, and the contemporary adoption of a Chinese daughter by American parents. Davies, is a Professor in the Helen Zell MFA Program in Creative Writing at the University of Michigan.

This event is sponsored by the Baker-Nord Center for the Humanities.  Click HERE to register.


How Recent Work in Philosophy of Science Contributed to Work on the Foundation of Morals
September 21, 2017
4:30 pm
Inamori Center, Tinkham Veale University Center, 11038 Bellflower Road  
Speaker is Richard Boyd.  The event is free and open to the public.


Vees-Gulani ImageFaculty Work-in-Progress –
The Air War in the Museum: The Bombing of Dresden as History and Spectacle
September 26, 2017
4:30 pm
Clark Hall Room 206, 11130 Bellflower Road, Cleveland, OH  44106
Susanne Vees-Gulani, Associate Professor of German in the Department of Modern Languages and Literatures, explores the representations of the 1945 destruction of the famous German baroque city in two new exhibition spaces – the Military History Museum of the German Armed Forces, redesigned by Daniel Libeskind, and the large-scale panorama installations by the architect Yadegar Asisi. Despite vastly different methodologies, both places favor an emotional experience over a factual analysis and in turn create opportunities for developing a new, possibly troubling, German nationalism.

This event is sponsored by the Baker-Nord Center for the Humanities.  Click HERE to register.

 

OCTOBER

 

Katherine BooRose Wohlegemuth Weisman Women’s Voices Lecture –
The New Exploitation Economy
October 3, 2017
4:30 pm
Tinkham Veale University Center, 11038 Bellflower Road, Cleveland, OH  44106
In her lecture, Katherine Boo, staff writer at The New Yorker and a former reporter and editor for The Washington Post, will provide field notes from global reporting on families who lack privilege and power. Boo’s reporting has been awarded a Pulitzer Prize, a MacArthur “Genius” grant, and a National Magazine Award for Feature Writing.

This event is sponsored by the Baker-Nord Center for the Humanities.  Click HERE to register.


Abdullah ImageGraduate Student Work-in-Progress –
Opera, Shakespeare, and the Creation of Romanticism
October 5, 2017
4:30 pm
Clark Hall Room 206, 11130 Bellflower Road, Cleveland, OH  44106
Shakespeare’s current position atop the global literary pantheon belies a complex history of reception, especially in continental Europe. By examining the collision of early nineteenth-century Shakespeare reception and nascent romantic opera, Musicology PhD candidate Paul Abdullah highlights the entanglements of literary and musical histories for the romantic generation.

This event is sponsored by the Baker-Nord Center for the Humanities.  Click HERE to register.


Weiss ImageBetween Académie and Arsenal: Ships, Servitude and the Sun King
October 6, 2017
5:00 pm
Cleveland Museum of Art, Recital Hall, 11150 East Boulevard, Cleveland, OH 44106
In their presentation, Meredith Martin, Associate Professor of Art History at New York University, and Gillian Weiss, Associate Professor of History at Case Western Reserve University, will examine the motif of the chained or enslaved Turk in a wide range of artistic media – ship design, artillery sculpture, medals, paintings, and prints – produced in France during the reign of Louis XIV. Drawing attention to the neglected genre of Mediterranean maritime art and the forced labor integral to its creation, it will explore how servile figures purchased to row on royal galleys also helped build and decorate naval vessels and other artistic forms that circulated between coast and capital to proclaim the power of the Sun King.

This event is co-sponsored by the Baker-Nord Center for the Humanities, the Department of Art History and Art, and the Department of History, and is free and open to the public.


Arab LegionFaculty Work-in-Progress –
Iraq and Syria, 1941:
Working Around Lies, Exaggerations, Distortions, and Deletions to Tell a Little-known Story of WWII
October 10, 2017
12:00 pm
Clark Hall Room 206, 11130 Bellflower Road, Cleveland, OH 44106
In spring 1941, the Iraqis and the Vichy French in Syria made agreements with the Axis powers that might have had disastrous consequences for the Allied war effort if the Allies hadn’t improvised a jerrybuilt force to respond. In his talk, Professor Broich, Associate Professor in the Department of History, argues that this fight in Iraq and the Levant had outsized geopolitical importance in part because it was relatively small in scale compared to the titanic battles in North Africa and Russia in the same year. This magnified the importance of the choices made by relatively few people, from rulers to common soldiers from across the globe, and its on these people and choices that his book focuses. His talk centers on the difficulty he’s encountered getting at the truth of affair when the historical sources have been obscured by wartime propaganda, colonial delusions, nationalist flimflam, and erasure.

This event is sponsored by the Baker-Nord Center for the Humanities.  Click HERE to register.


Lu ImageGirih Tiles: Decagonal Geometry in Medieval Islamic Architectural Tilings and Beyond
October 25, 2017
5:00 pm
Cleveland Museum of Art, Recital Hall, 11150 East Boulevard, Cleveland, OH 44106
The conventional view holds that geometric star-and-polygon patterns in medieval Islamic architecture were designed using a straightedge and a compass. Peter Lu, a research associate at Harvard University, will present his findings that, instead, a wide variety of patterns with five- and ten-fold symmetry were conceived as tessellations of specific decorated puzzles pieces, called girih tiles, that appear in medieval Islamic architectural scrolls. Beginning in the 12th century, patterns designed with these girih tiles appeared throughout the Islamic world, from North Africa to the Middle East and Central Asia, for more than half a millennium—and in some cases exhibit mathematical principles that we in the West did not understand until the past few decades. 

This event is co-sponsored by the Baker-Nord Center for the Humanities, the Department of Physics, and the Department of Art History and Art,
and is free and open to the public.


NOVEMBER/DECEMBER

Popkin EventFaculty Work-in-Progress –
Object Memory: Souvenirs and Memorabilia in the Roman Empire
November 2, 2017
4:30 pm
Clark Hall Room 206, 11139 Bellflower Road, Cleveland, OH 44106
The Roman Empire produced a rich range of souvenirs and memorabilia commemorating cities, monuments, sporting and theatrical events, and religious rituals. At a time when literacy was limited and visual communication was essential, these objects were a critical means for generating and mediating memory and knowledge of their represented subjects. This talk examines various examples of Roman souvenirs and memorabilia, including glass flasks engraved with scenes of tourist destinations, miniature replicas of famous cult statues, and drinking cups with pictures of famous gladiators and charioteers. Maggie Popkin, Assistant Professor in the Department of Art History and Art, explores how these objects constructed knowledge in an era before mechanical and digital reproduction. Although often overlooked by historians of Roman art, souvenirs and memorabilia shed fascinating light on how objects and images helped ancient Romans conceptualize their world.

This event is sponsored by the Baker-Nord Center for the Humanities.  Click HERE to register.


Dylan CoverWhy Bob Dylan Matters
November 16, 2017
7:00 pm
Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Library and Archives, 2809 Woodland Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44115
Harvard Classics Professor, teacher since 2004 of the freshman seminar, “Bob Dylan”, and celebrated ‘Dylanologist’ Richard F. Thomas makes a compelling case for why the music and lyrics of Bob Dylan endure and inspire us. Thomas discusses his new book Why Bob Dylan Matters with MacArthur Fellow and fellow Dylanologist Thomas Palaima and Professor Daniel Goldmark, Director of CWRU’s Center for Popular Music Studies.

This event is sponsored by the Baker-Nord Center for the Humanities.  Click HERE to register.


Kitcher2017 Walter A. Strauss Lecture Series
Celebrated philosopher Philip Kitcher of Columbia University is known for his studies of the role of scientific inquiry in democratic societies from the perspective the philosophy of pragmatism associated with William James and John Dewey. In a series of three lectures on “Education and Democracy,” Kitcher broadens this inquiry to investigate the aims of education with emphasis on the importance of the humanities and the arts. This lecture series, in memory of Walter A. Strauss (1923-2008), who was the Elizabeth and William T. Treuhaft Professor of Humanities, is generously supported by funds provided by the Paul Wurzburger Endowment.

This series is sponsored by the Baker-Nord Center for the Humanities.

 

Too Many Aims?
November 27, 2017
5:00 pm
Wolstein Building Auditorium, 2103 Cornell Road, Cleveland, OH  44106
In this lecture, Kitcher suggests that a number of different approaches to the aims of education have considerable plausibility. When they are combined, as they sometimes are by writers such as Mill and Dewey, the task of providing an adequate education looks formidable. Kitcher argues for a way of taking on the challenge.  Click HERE to register.

Shaping the Citizen
November 29, 2017
5:00 pm
Wolstein Building Auditorium, 2103 Cornell Road, Cleveland, OH 44106
One major goal of education is to prepare young people for participation in democratic societies. Existing educational policies tend to offer a shallow view of what is required. In this lecture, Kitcher argues for a rich and demanding conception of democracy, and for a correspondingly rich educational preparation,  Click HERE to register.

The Importance of the Sciences – and the Arts
December 1, 2017
5:00 pm
Wolstein Building Auditorium, 2103 Cornell Road, Cleveland, OH  44106
Today in the USA there is much concern about education in the sciences. The reasons offered are typically incomplete. In this talk, Kitcher offers a more extensive account of why education in the sciences is important for everyone, and couples it with the thesis that a broad and deep education in the arts and humanities is equally necessary. Click HERE to register.

Page last modified: August 15, 2017