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Making, Mining, Marking and Mashing: The Digital Humanities Curriculum in 2025

Date: Wed. March 25th, 2015, 4:30 pm-6:00 pm
Location: Clark Hall Room 206, 11130 Bellflower Road

A Baker-Nord Digital Humanities Event

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Mills Kelly, Professor of History at George Mason University, will challenge the audience to think about what the humanities curriculum will look like ten years hence. How will advances in digital media change the ways that students learn about and make sense of the humanities, and how should humanities departments begin changing their curricula to prepare students for advanced thinking about the big ideas in the humanities?

Free and open to the public.  Registration Recommended. Registration Button

 

 

 

 

 


About the speaker

Mills Kelly

Mills Kelly

Mills Kelly is a professor in the Department of History and Art History at George Mason University.  He is a specialist in the scholarship of teaching and learning in history. His most recent book, Teaching History in the Digital Age was published by the University of Michigan Press in 2013. He is also the author of more than a dozen articles on the intersection of historical pedagogy and digital humanities.

Kelly is also an associate director of George Mason’s award-winning Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media, where he has been either co-director or principal investigator on three major website projects funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities.

He is a trustee of the Romanian-American Foundation and from 1998-2002 he was Chair of the Board of Directors of the Civic Education Project, an international non-governmental organization working to promote democracy in post-Communist Eastern Europe and the states of the former Soviet Union.

 

 


Additional Resources:

Click HERE for Mills Kelly’s faculty page.

Click HERE for an interview with Mills Kelly.

 

Page last modified: March 18, 2015