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Upcoming Events

Event Date and Location Summary
2016 Walter A. Strauss Lecture – Censors at Work: How States Shaped Literature Tue. September 27th, 2016
5:00 pm-6:00 pm
at Tinkham Veale University Center, Ballroom C, 11038 Bellflower Road


The difficulty with the history of censorship is that it looks so simple: it pits oppression against freedom of expression. But if one looks harder, it appears more complicated—and full of surprises. …Read more.

New Light on Old Papal Rome: Recent Finds from the Archive of the Boncompagni Ludovisi Fri. September 30th, 2016
4:30 pm-5:30 pm
at Clark Hall Room 206, 11130 Bellflower Road

The focus of this talk is the 2010 discovery of archival material that sheds unexpected light on centuries of Boncompagni Ludovisi family history, including the pontificates of Popes Gregory XIII and Gregory XV, and the development of the famed Villa Ludovisi, an enormous private enclave on the Pincio hill in Rome that was for centuries a “must see” stop on the Grand Tour. …Read more.

2016 Issa Lecture: Beyond Words; What Animals Think and Feel Tue. October 4th, 2016
5:00 pm-6:00 pm
at Tinkham Veale University Center, Ballroom C, 11038 Bellflower Road

 
Does your dog really love you or does she just want a treat? Long thought to be beyond reach of inquiry, Carl Safina, marine ecologist and author most recently of Beyond Words: What Animals Think and Feel, will discuss how animal thought and emotion can be considered by looking at the brain, evolution, and the context of behaviors. …Read more.

Boondoggle! The Struggle to Build the Eisenhower Memorial Fri. October 7th, 2016
4:30 pm-5:30 pm
at Wolstein Building Auditorium, 2103 Cornell Road

Authorized by Congress seventeen years ago, the Eisenhower Memorial is still on the drawing board. Its design by starchitect Frank Gehry for the National Mall remains unfunded by Congress and the target of a storm of criticism. …Read more.

A Sorting Hat for the Digital Humanities:  Content and Design Considerations for Longevity, Access, and Stability Wed. October 12th, 2016
12:00 pm-1:00 pm
at Clark Hall Room 206, 11130 Bellflower Road

A humanities scholar embarking on a digital project often has little guidance in choices he or she must make at a very early stage.  What object formats can be supported now and in the future?  …Read more.

Graduate Student Work-in-Progress – : “Take Polaroid”: Showcasing the American Way of Life in the Soviet Union Thu. October 13th, 2016
4:30 pm-5:30 pm
at Clark Hall Room 206, 11130 Bellflower Road

The American humorist Irene Kampen chronicled her eight-week sojourn to the Soviet Union in the summer of 1969 in her fascinating travelogue, Are You Carrying Any Gold or Living Relatives? …Read more.

Faculty-Work-in-Progress – Italy by Way of India: Routes of Devotional Knowledge in the Early Modern Period Tue. October 18th, 2016
4:30 pm-5:30 pm
at Clark Hall Room 206, 11130 Bellflower Road

 
Travel between the vying reliquary sites of St. Thomas Apostle in Chennai, India and Ortona, Italy ruptured narrative continuity in the formation of his European cult while simultaneously fostering a thriving Indian culture of ‘Thomas Christianity.’ The arrival of missionaries and merchants from Italy and Portugal during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries further complicated the homologous nature of so-called Thomas Christianity and resulted in the production of objects that merge Christian and Hindu iconographies in ways that are here elucidated for the first time. …Read more.

Faculty-Work-in-Progress – Walking Stories: Digital literature and a Poetics of Drift Tue. November 1st, 2016
4:30 pm-5:30 pm
at Clark Hall Room 206, 11130 Bellflower Road

In her talk SAGES Fellow Kristine Kelly reflects on wandering as it figures in the works of digital media artists and storytellers like JR Carpenter and Megan Heyward and also in first-person audio accounts of everyday walkers. …Read more.

2016 Ubbelohde Lecture: What Ails Democracy? Thu. November 3rd, 2016
7:30 pm-8:30 pm
at Tinkham Veale University Center, Ballroom C, 11038 Bellflower Road

James T. Kloppenberg, Charles Warren Professor of American History at Harvard University is one of the leading intellectual historians in the United States.  Drawing from the work in his newest book, Toward Democracy: The Struggle for Self-Rule in European and American Thought, and his award-winning 2011 book, Reading Obama: Dreams, Hope, and the American Political Tradition, he will help us consider the historical context of the American political tradition as we reach the culmination of a tumultuous political campaign. …Read more.

Richard N. Campen Lecture in Architecture and Sculpture: Now I Sit Me Down Thu. November 10th, 2016
5:00 pm-6:00 pm
at Thwing Center Ballroom, 11111 Euclid Avenue

Have you ever wondered where the rocking chair came from, or why cheap plastic chairs are everywhere? The way we choose to sit and what we choose to sit on speak volumes about our values, our tastes, and the things we hold dear. …Read more.

Humanities@Work: Food Mon. November 14th, 2016
6:00 pm-7:00 pm
at Clark Hall Room 206, 11130 Bellflower Road

Panelists discuss how studying the humanities influenced their careers and answer questions from the audience. Panelists include:
Patrick Conway (Loyola University Chicago, ‘74) majored in Urban Studies. …Read more.

Faculty-Work-in-Progress: Jordan’s Long War Tue. November 15th, 2016
4:30 pm-5:30 pm
at Clark Hall Room 206, 11130 Bellflower Road

Since its inception as a monarchy and a state during World War One, the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan has participated in or been linked to nearly every major war in the Middle East. …Read more.

Graduate Student Work-in-Progress: American Femmes fatales Thu. December 1st, 2016
4:30 pm-5:30 pm
at Clark Hall Room 206, 11130 Bellflower Road

 
In two recent operas, Anna Nicole (2011) and American Lulu (2013), artists have updated and adapted the genre’s old archetype of the fallen woman – and moved the setting to the American South. …Read more.

Past Events

Event Date Summary
Wonder Woman Symposium Fri. September 23rd, 2016
3:00 pm-5:00 pm

Babes in Arms
During World War ll, when the young men left their jobs to fight overseas, women took their places: in the factories, driving trucks and buses, building and flying planes — and in comics.  …Read more.

Humanities@Work: Sports Mon. September 19th, 2016
6:30 pm-7:30 pm

Panelists discuss how studying the humanities influenced their careers. Panelists include:
Amy Backus (Central Michigan University ‘79) majored in education with a minor in English. She is Director of Athletics and Chair of Physical Education at CWRU. …Read more.

What Have We Learned About Culture, Disadvantage and Black Youth? Wed. September 14th, 2016
4:30 pm-6:00 pm

THIS EVENT HAS REACHED CAPACITY – REGISTRATION CLOSED
A substantial minority of black youth suffer major disadvantages in America–racism; ghettoization; poverty; high drop-out, unemployment and incarceration rates; violence and policy brutality — yet are among the most culturally creative and influential groups in the nation. …Read more.

High Performance Computing (HPC) Bootcamp Tue. September 13th, 2016
9:00 am-5:00 pm


Big data can be considered any data set outside the scope of a person to adequately process and interpret. Many fields study existing data or data generated via collected, research study, or clinical information. …Read more.

Big Data in Humanities, Arts, and Social Science Wed. May 11th, 2016
11:00 am-12:00 pm

Data abounds that is of interest to scholars in the humanities, arts, and social science.  High performance computing offers the opportunity to analyze large collections of data to aid in answering questions of interest to humankind, as well as for deriving new questions of interest.  …Read more.

Cyberinfrastructure for the study of multimodal communication—language, gesture, art Wed. May 11th, 2016
10:30 am-11:30 am

This talk will review the big data and machine learning methods and instruments developed in the Red Hen Lab for the study of multimodal communication, including our teams of coders in two successive Google Summers of Code, and our collaboration with the CWRU High-Performance Computing Group to create efficient production pipelines.   …Read more.

Cleveland in the Political Crosshairs: A Panel Discussion Tue. May 10th, 2016
5:00 pm-6:00 pm

With the date of the Republican National Convention fast approaching, Cleveland the focus of the nation and the world is turning to us, with possible implications for our city and region. …Read more.

Symposium – Legacies of Nazi Perpetrators: Looking at Hitler and Himmler Today Thu. April 21st, 2016
4:30 pm-6:30 pm


Brad Prager (University of Missouri, Columbia): “Pinpointing the Evil in Nazi Family Photographs.”
Michael Richardson (Ithaca College): “The Führer’s Face: Images of Hitler in Popular Visual Culture.”
The Holocaust and its perpetrators have left a legacy of evil which has permeated our lives and culture like no other. …Read more.

Surprising Interactions: Unlocking Content through Personal Experience Wed. April 20th, 2016
6:00 pm-7:00 pm

This is event is co-sponsored with Books@Work, which conducts seminars in community and company settings. Students bring to their reading a wide array of personal experiences that shape the way they engage with content–how can we make the most of it? …Read more.

Humanities@Work: Entrepreneurs Mon. April 18th, 2016
6:00 pm-6:45 pm

In this panel, designed for undergraduate Students, Cleveland area entrepreneurs will discuss how studying the humanities influenced their careers. Panelists include Kathleen Barrie (art history and studio art) and Dennis Barrie (history and art history), principals at Barrie Projects, a museum and cultural planning firm that specializes in developing unusual and often surprising exhibits and visitor destinations; Rebecca Braun (linguistics and Russian), an entrepreneur, venture development consultant, and author, she is president of The Braun Group, producer of executive memoirs and biographies in a variety of formats; Baiju Shah (history), an entrepreneur in the biomedical field, he is currently CEO of BioMotiv, a biotech company focused on accelerating research discoveries into medicines; and Mike Mitchell (philosophy), with his brother Pete, he founded Mitchell’s Ice Cream in 1999. …Read more.

Food Justice, Food Sovereignty: Transforming our Food System Thu. April 14th, 2016
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

In his lecture, Eric Holt-Giménez, executive director of Food First/Institute for Food and Development Policy, will address the structural inequity and inherent unsustainability of our current food system and the role and challenges for the food movement in systems transformation. …Read more.

Warrior Chorus Sun. April 10th, 2016
3:00 pm-5:00 pm

2016  CLEVELAND HUMANITIES FESTIVAL: REMEMBERING WAR
Warrior Chorus is a major new national humanities program by New York’s Aquila Theatre Company, training 100 veterans in four regional centers to present scholar-led public programming based on classical literature.   …Read more.

The Wades in Wartime – 1830-1945 Sat. April 9th, 2016
2:00 pm-3:00 pm

2016 CLEVELAND HUMANITIES FESTIVAL: REMEMBERING WAR
The name Wade is familiar to many in northeast Ohio who enjoy Wade Park, the area surrounding Wade Lagoon, or those who attend Wade Oval Wednesdays.   …Read more.

The Baker-Nord Distinguished Faculty Lecture – Thirty Four Miles from Kent State: CWRU and the Vietnam War Fri. April 8th, 2016
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

2016 CLEVELAND HUMANITIES FESTIVAL: REMEMBERING WAR
While not Berkeley or Columbia, Case Western Reserve University became a visible part of American campus unrest in May 1970 when students blocked traffic on Euclid Avenue in the wake of the shootings at nearby Kent State University.  …Read more.

Feeding War: Gender, Health, and the Mobilized Kitchen in WWI Germany Thu. April 7th, 2016
6:00 pm-7:00 pm

2016 CLEVELAND HUMANITIES FESTIVAL: REMEMBERING WAR
Heather R. Perry, Associate Professor of History at the University of North Carolina, Charlotte, will share her research on World War 1’s impact on the homefront in Germany. …Read more.

Rose Wohlgemuth Weisman Women’s Voices Lecture – Mourning for Lost Art Tue. April 5th, 2016
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

2016 CLEVELAND HUMANITIES FESTIVAL: REMEMBERING WAR
In times of war, why do armies destroy cultural artefacts? And what does it mean when we, far away onlookers, mourn that destruction even as lives are being lost? …Read more.

Under Cover of War: The Armenian Genocide and Its Continuing Ramifications Mon. April 4th, 2016
6:00 pm-7:00 pm

2016 CLEVELAND HUMANITIES FESTIVAL: REMEMBERING WAR

World War I provided the cover for the ultranationalist “Young Turk” dictatorship of the Ottoman Empire to take brutal measures to eliminate the native Armenian population. …Read more.

Film Screening and Panel Discussion – May 4th Voices: Kent State, 1970 Sun. April 3rd, 2016
2:00 pm-4:00 pm

2016 CLEVELAND HUMANITIES FESTIVAL: REMEMBERING WAR
Screening of the award-winning documentary film May 4th Voices: Kent State, 1970. The film is based on the play May 4th Voices, which comes from the Kent State Shootings Oral History Project, a project that collects and provides access to personal accounts of the May 4, 1970, shootings at Kent State and their aftermath. …Read more.

Remembering War – Keynote Address: Moral Injury and War Fri. April 1st, 2016
4:30 pm-6:00 pm

2016 CLEVELAND HUMANITIES FESTIVAL: REMEMBERING WAR
What is it about the experience of war that can ruin the lives of the men and women whom we send off to fight? …Read more.

Graduate Student Work-in-Progress – Global Fictions, Religious Violence, and Secularism’s Antinomies of Value Tue. March 29th, 2016
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

For several contemporary novelists, secularism and globalization collide in a way that recasts sociopolitical debates as questions of aesthetic value. By configuring religious practices as models for aesthetic perception, transnational writers such as Salman Rushdie, Mohsin Hamid, and Nadine Gordimer transform contemporary anxieties about religious violence by highlighting art’s vulnerability to the violence of markets and states. …Read more.

Faculty-Work-in-Progress – Attempt at a Mythology Tue. March 22nd, 2016
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

What place do our oldest stories have in twenty-first century poetry? How can contemporary lyric make and unmake myths of its own? In this talk on his manuscript in progress, SAGES Fellow and poet Dave Lucas calls upon the wisdom and failures of these texts to reckon with our own moment in human history, in which we seem collectively balanced on the brink of anthropological and ecological disaster of mythic proportions. …Read more.

Graduate Student Work-in-Progress – The Amateur Instrument: Teenagers, the Electric Bass, and Garage Bands 1958-1964 Thu. March 17th, 2016
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

 
This lecture examines how the electric bass transitioned in the late 1950s and early 1960s to its current position as rock’s primary low-end instrument. Through an exploration of the musical, social, and economic culture of American teenagers, Brian Wright, a graduate student in the Department of Music, argues that the normalization of the electric bass resulted from the confluence of three distinct historical trends: the popularity of instrumental rock bands like the Ventures, a grassroots influx of self-taught amateur musicians, and the prosperous economic climate of the late 1950s. …Read more.

Faculty-Work-in-Progress –  From Translation and its Aftermath: The Soviet Legacy in a Post–Socialist Cuba Thu. March 3rd, 2016
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

In her lecture, Damaris Punales-Alpizar, Assistant Professor of Spanish, proposes an approach to the socialist literature in Spanish that was consumed in Cuba from the sixties to the nineties and, following the theories of translation of Itamar Evan-Zohar, attempts to elucidate the peripheral and central role that such literature had in the formation of a Cuban literary polysystem.  …Read more.

The Joseph and Violet Magyar Lecture in Hungarian Studies: Hungarian Foreign Policy – Renewed and Adjusted to Today’s Challenges Tue. March 1st, 2016
5:00 pm-6:00 pm

THIS EVENT HAS BEEN CANCELLED DUE TO THE AMBASSADOR’S REQUIRED TRAVEL TO THE HOME OFFICE.  WE HOPE TO RESCHEDULE SOON.  PLEASE WATCH THE WEBSITE FOR UPDATES.
 
H.E. Dr. …Read more.

Graduate Student Work-in-Progress – A Comedy in Five Acts: A Gamified Pedagogical Approach to Shakespeare Thu. February 25th, 2016
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

Michelle Lyons-McFarland, a PhD candidate in the Department of English, will explore what it means to take plot, trope, and narrative and turn them into game rules, in effect highlighting them for players/students and audiences. …Read more.

Humanities@Work:Law Mon. February 22nd, 2016
6:00 pm-7:00 pm

Panelists discuss how studying the humanities influenced their careers.
Panelists include:
Joel Levin (University of Chicago ’82) majored in history and philosophy. As a lawyer at Levin & Associates Co., LPA, he represents victims against wayward banks, financial institutions, lawyers, accountants, police, sheriffs’ offices and prison officials. …Read more.

Faculty-Work-in-Progress – Invisible Women: Gabon’s ‘Empty Canon’ Thu. February 4th, 2016
4:30 pm-5:15 pm

Gabon is unique in that its women writers have historically been predominate in creating its national literature. Despite its many milestones in this area, however, this tiny nation has not received the critical attention that other African neighbors have enjoyed. …Read more.

Exceptional Measures: The Human Sciences in STEM Worlds Thu. January 28th, 2016
5:00 pm-6:00 pm

PLEASE NOTE NEW LECTURE TOPIC
In this lecture, Jerome McGann, John Stewart Bryan Professor at the University of Virginia, discusses the idea that Humanist studies focus primarily on phenomena that is singular, idiosyncratic, and – in a word – personal. …Read more.

Humanities@Case Fri. January 22nd, 2016
12:30 pm-1:30 pm

Panelists will discuss the resources available specifically to undergraduate humanities students at Case Western Reserve University and answer questions from the audience. Panelists include:
Elizabeth Banks, Director of the Center for Civic Engagement and Learning, will discuss the opportunities for community service and active learning. …Read more.

Edge of Disaster–Vaccines and Epidemics Thu. January 21st, 2016
6:30 pm-7:30 pm

The recent outbreak of Ebola in parts of Africa–and the frightened posts and live-tweets that accompanied two infected health workers as they returned to the US–give us a glimpse not only of an epidemic’s power but of our private terrors. …Read more.

Poetry Reading with Dan Beachy-Quick Fri. November 20th, 2015
3:00 pm-4:00 pm

Dan Beachy-Quick, a Monfort Professor teaching in the MFA Creative Writing Program at Colorado State University, joins the English Department’s colloquium for a poetry reading. He is the author of several books of poetry including North True South Bright (2003), Spell (2004), Mulberry (2006), This Nest, Swift Passerine (2009), Circle’s Apprentice (2011, Winner of the Colorado Book Award in Poetry) and gentlessness (2015). …Read more.

Faculty-Work-in-Progress: Trash, Place, and Chinese Ecocinema: On Wang Jiuliang’s Eco-Documentaries Thu. November 19th, 2015
12:00 pm-1:00 pm

What does ecocinema mean for Chinese cinema? In his talk, Haomin Gong, Assistant Professor in the Department of Modern Languages and Literatures, takes two documentaries, Beijing Besieged by Waste and Plastic China, made by the Chinese filmmaker Wang Jiuliang as examples, and investigates the issues of place and displacement in the forming of the discourse of trash in contemporary China.   …Read more.

A Talk in the Vineyard with Mansfield Frazier Wed. November 18th, 2015
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

Community activist and entrepreneur Mansfield Frazier leads The Vineyards and BioCellar of Château Hough, an urban vineyard located in Cleveland at the intersection of East 66th and Hough where grapes are grown for award-winning wines. …Read more.

Cuban Literature Today: Tendencies and Perspectives Mon. November 16th, 2015
5:00 pm-6:00 pm

THIS EVENT HAS BEEN CANCELLED.    …Read more.

Poetry Reading by Jorie Graham Fri. November 13th, 2015
3:00 pm-4:00 pm

Due to family illness, this event has been CANCELLED.  A reading with poet Dan Beachy-Quick has been scheduled for Friday, November 20 at 3 pm.  Click HERE for more information and to register for that event. …Read more.

Graduate Student Work-in-Progress: Black Entertainment in the Heart of Cleveland’s “Colored District,” 1922-30 Tue. November 10th, 2015
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

Peter Graff, a graduate student in the Department of Music, will discuss how Cleveland’s Globe Theater (Woodland avenue and E. 55th street), once a venue for live Yiddish entertainment, rebranded itself in 1922 to capitalize on the city’s burgeoning black population. …Read more.

Humanities@Work: CEOs Mon. November 9th, 2015
6:00 pm-7:00 pm

During this event planned for undergraduate students, Cleveland area CEOs discuss how studying the humanities influenced their careers.  Panelists include:
Marc S. Byrnes (Williams College ‘76) majored in history. …Read more.

Baker-Nord Faculty Lecture: Where Do Characters Come From? Wed. November 4th, 2015
5:00 pm-6:00 pm

Readers come to books in search of characters they can love, hate, empathize with or relate to. But how do writers create characters that are realistic and who remain with the reader after he or she is done with a novel? …Read more.

CWRU English Colloquium Series: What Was Historicism? Fri. October 30th, 2015
3:00 pm-4:00 pm

A generation ago, a “new historicism” blew like a fresh breeze through the stuffy institution of literary criticism; now, after decades of success, it is routinely attacked as a stuffy institution itself. …Read more.

Faculty-Work-in-Progress: UPA and Modernist Cartoon Music Tue. October 27th, 2015
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

The United Productions of America (UPA) animation studio, which came to prominence on the big and small screen in the years following World War II, profoundly changed animation from the dominance of Disney’s naturalistic approach to a more modern, even avant-garde style, with cartoons like Gerald McBoing-Boing and the Mister Magoo series. …Read more.

“Lost” Between Memory and History: Writing the Holocaust for the Next Generation Thu. October 22nd, 2015
6:00 pm-7:00 pm

Daniel Mendelsohn, Charles Ranlett Flint Professor of Humanities at Bard College, draws upon his experience researching, writing, and then touring The Lost around the world. He explores the meaning of the Holocaust as both a historical and a literary event as time passes and the event belongs to a new generation of writers, and readers, who no longer have direct contact with the event itself. …Read more.

Inamori Ethics Prize Academic Symposium Fri. October 16th, 2015
12:30 pm-2:00 pm

As part of the 2015 Inamori Ethics Prize events, prize recipient Professor Martha Nussbaum will participate in a lively, moderated discussion with international experts and audience Q&A on her groundbreaking Capabilities Approach to global ethics that gives practical direction for seeking justice and positive change for those who cannot access opportunities or enjoy the basic freedoms they need to flourish and unlock their potential.  …Read more.

The 2015 Inamori Ethics Prize Ceremony and Lecture: Human Development and the Capabilities Approach in Global Ethics  Thu. October 15th, 2015
6:00 pm-7:30 pm

The 2015 Inamori Ethics Prize will be awarded to celebrated philosopher and scholar Martha Nussbaum, the Ernst Freund Distinguished Service Professor of Law and Ethics at the University of Chicago. …Read more.

Graduate Student Work-in-Progress: Illustrating Little Manhood & Erasing Black Boyhood in African American Picture Books  Thu. October 8th, 2015
4:30 pm-5:30 pm


Cara Byrne, a graduate student in the Department of English, will examine the complexities of visualizing black male identity, especially for and about young black boys. There is a long legacy of picture books that teach young African American boys to become “little men,” leaving behind childish ways to demonstrate rigid maturity and asexual masculinity.  …Read more.

Book Publishing in the Humanities Mon. October 5th, 2015
12:00 pm-1:00 pm

The publishing process for scholars in the humanities is often a confusing one, especially for first-time authors. Today’s shifting landscape of scholarly publishing, with new formats and media for disseminating and promoting scholarship, confronts a would-be author with numerous choices.  …Read more.

The Rita Hayworth of this Generation: A Solo Play Starring Tina D’Elia Sat. October 3rd, 2015
7:00 pm-9:00 pm

The Rita Hayworth of this Generation is the story of Carmelita Cristina Rivera, a queer Latina performer, who is ready to premier her show, an homage to Rita Hayworth, in a seedy Las Vegas nightclub.   …Read more.

Graduate Student Work-in-Progress: From the Street to the Stage: Popular Song and the Construction of Parisian Spectacle, 1648-1713 Tue. September 29th, 2015
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

As a Fulbright scholar in Paris for the 2014-2015 academic year, John Romey,a graduate student in the Department of Music, undertook an enormous archival project that catalogued and analyzed manuscript chansonniers and print sources documenting song texts that circulated in street culture. …Read more.

“Secrets of old Philisoffres”: The Secretum Secretorum and Premodern Gerontology Thu. September 24th, 2015
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

This event has been cancelled. …Read more.

The Soul of Cleveland Mon. September 21st, 2015
5:30 pm-7:00 pm


Hear about the street named for a poet, an Idea Garage, our forgotten entrepreneurs passionate about our waterways and from the audience. The Soul of Cleveland project derives from a celebration in discussion form. …Read more.

Humanities@Work: Medicine Mon. September 21st, 2015
6:00 pm-7:00 pm

During this event planned for undergraduate students, panelists discuss how studying the humanities influenced their careers.  Panelists Include:
Mark Warren (Wesleyan ’75) put together his own major in American Studies. …Read more.

Unrepentant Traveler, Accidental Diplomat: Gabriela Mistral, Latin America’s First Nobel Laureate and Feminist Icon Fri. September 18th, 2015
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

How did a mixed-race woman, born into poverty in the remote Andes, whose formal education ended with primary school become a literary celebrity? Biographer Elizabeth Horan will point to the challenges and rewards of researching a figure whose vast network, achieved through travel, correspondence and published writings, made her the most powerful woman in the Spanish-speaking world. …Read more.

Navigating Pathways of Support: A Panel for Graduate Students on Research Resources at Case Western Reserve University Thu. September 17th, 2015
12:00 pm-1:00 pm


Digital humanities initiatives around campus are up and running, meaning that we are ready to help you build, develop, collaborate on and fund digital scholarship! Have an idea for a project? …Read more.

9/11 Chronomania: Terror and the Temporal Imagination Fri. September 11th, 2015
3:00 pm-4:00 pm

For billions around the world, the events of 9/11 were experienced as a rupture, a periodizing event that cast the world into a new period of danger and uncertainty. …Read more.

A Tale of Two Plantations: a Comparative Approach to Caribbean and U.S. Slavery Wed. September 9th, 2015
5:00 pm-6:00 pm

Richard Dunn, Roy F. and Jeannette P. Nichols Professor Emeritus of American History at the University of Pennsylvania and winner of a 2015 Anisfield-Wolf Book Award, has reconstructed the individual lives and collective experiences of two thousand slaves who lived on Mesopotamia sugar estate in western Jamaica and Mount Airy plantation in Tidewater Virginia.  …Read more.

Religion and Secularism across the Humanities: An Interdisciplinary Forum Wed. May 6th, 2015
2:00 pm-4:00 pm

A Baker-Nord Working Group Event
 

Over the past decade, numerous disciplines in the humanities and social sciences have spoken of a “religious turn.” This pattern is characterized by a resurgent interest in interdisciplinary scholarship that revaluates central questions about the relationship between religion and secularism in the academy and in our objects of study. …Read more.

Literature, Sexuality, and the Postsecular: Intersections and Possibilities – A Workshop Wed. April 29th, 2015
11:00 am-12:00 pm

What is “the postsecular,” and why should it matter to the study of literature and sexuality? Exploring various possible answers, this workshop emphasizes the significance of recent debates in secularization theory to scholarly analyses of non-normative and transnational representations of sexual subjectivities. …Read more.

Humanities@Work: MEDICINE Mon. April 27th, 2015
6:00 pm-7:30 pm

Four doctors and a medical student will discuss how studying the humanities influenced their careers. Participants include:
Mark Scher (Rochester ‘72) majored in history and biology. He is Professor of Pediatrics and Neurology at the Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and Division Chief in Pediatric Neurology at Rainbow Babies and Children’s Hospital at University Hospitals Case Medical Center. …Read more.

The Body in the Book: the Fabrica and the Epitome (1543) Thu. April 16th, 2015
6:00 pm-7:00 pm

 

December 2014 marked the 500th anniversary of the birth of Andreas Vesalius and medical history institutions across American and Europe are marking this occasion with celebratory exhibitions and programs. To commemorate Vesalius’ legacy, the Cleveland Medical Library Association is hosting this special public lecture by Sachiko Kusukawa. …Read more.

Who Started World War I? Centenary Debates about War Guilt and Meaning Wed. April 15th, 2015
4:30 pm-6:00 pm

A Niagara of new histories has greeted the centenary of the outbreak of World War I, and none more impressive or widely-read than Christopher Clark, Sleepwalkers: How Europe Went to War in 1914 (Harper, 2013). …Read more.

2015 F. Joseph Callahan Distinguished Lecture: “The Flight From Conversation” Mon. April 13th, 2015
6:00 pm-7:00 pm

2015 Callahan Distinguished Lecture presents professor, author, clinical psychologist Sherry Turkle on how technology is shaping our relationships
With personal communication dominated by texts, tweets and online posts, some wonder if social technology has hollowed out what it means to be social—that we are losing the art of conversation with disturbing consequences. …Read more.

Reading Interfaces: Inquiries at the Intersection of Literature and Technology Fri. April 10th, 2015
11:00 am-5:00 pm

A Baker-Nord Digital Humanities Event
Curated by Kristine Kelly and Allison Schifani

Free and open to the public, registration recommended. 
Electronic literature presents and generates literary performances that display, question, and critique ways of reading and modes of literary production in the digital age. …Read more.

The 2015 Edward S. and Melinda Melton Sadar Lecture in Writing in the Disciplines – Form, Subject, and Genre: Toward a History of Copyright for Newspaper and Magazine Writings Fri. April 10th, 2015
3:00 pm-4:00 pm

With respect to copyright law, periodicals have followed a different trajectory than books, and much of that difference has to do with the heterogeneous nature of newspapers and magazines. In the early twentieth century, periodicals in the United States and Great Britain obtained blanket copyrights that covered most of their contents, but this logic did not apply to the much more fluid textual universe of the nineteenth century. …Read more.

Reading Interfaces: Inquiries at the Intersection of Literature and Technology Thu. April 9th, 2015
12:00 pm-7:00 pm

A Baker-Nord Digital Humanities Event
Curated by Kristine Kelly and Allison Schifani

Free and open to the public, registration recommended. 
Electronic literature presents and generates literary performances that display, question, and critique ways of reading and modes of literary production in the digital age. …Read more.

The Joseph and Violet Magyar Lecture in Hungarian Studies: Counter-Constitutions: How a 21st Century Constitutional Revolution in Hungary Claimed Medieval Roots Thu. April 9th, 2015
4:30 pm-6:00 pm

Since independence in 1989, nationalist Hungarians have argued that the Holy Crown of St. Stephen and associated doctrines should be at the core of Hungary’s constitution. Kim Lane Scheppele – Rockefeller Professor of Sociology and International Affairs at Princeton University – will discuss how the Crown is both a literal object given by the Pope to the first Christian king of Hungary, in the year 1000 and – since medieval times – a key symbolic touchstone in the constitution of state power. …Read more.

Reading Interfaces: Inquiries at the Intersection of Literature and Technology Wed. April 8th, 2015
4:00 pm-7:30 pm

A Baker-Nord Digital Humanities Event
Curated by Kristine Kelly and Allison Schifani

Free and open to the public, registration recommended. 
Electronic literature presents and generates literary performances that display, question, and critique ways of reading and modes of literary production in the digital age. …Read more.

The 2015 biennial Beamer-Schneider Lecture in Ethics & Civics: “There is a crack in everything; that’s how the light gets through” Tue. April 7th, 2015
6:00 pm-7:00 pm

This lecture is presented by Michael Rakowitz who will discuss his social experiments categorized as “social practice art.” He will also be starting his project in Cleveland centered around the Tamir Rice killing: the redaction of orange. …Read more.

Cultural Waves: The Ancient Greek Contribution to Human Rights Thu. April 2nd, 2015
4:00 pm-5:00 pm

The U.S. government’s use of “enhanced interrogation techniques” since 9/11 has made the topic of basic human rights newly urgent. Professor Sternberg suggests that human rights concepts arose from humane discourse that developed in “cultural waves.” Through close philological work on ancient pity, Greek oiktos and eleos, she discovered that Athenians of the classical period (the 5th and 4th centuries BCE) invented humane values, even though they conspicuously failed to live up to them. …Read more.

Talking Back to the Book: Critical Digital Literacies in African American Rhetorical Traditions Wed. April 1st, 2015
4:30 pm-6:00 pm

In this talk, Adam Banks, Professor of Writing Rhetoric and Digital Studies at the University of Kentucky, will consider Stevie Wonder’s exploration of technologies in his pursuit of artistic independence from Motown in the early 1970s as an invocation and deployment of the Talking Book, a trope of literacy for freedom emerging from Black oral traditions.   …Read more.

An Afternoon with Patricia Harman Fri. March 27th, 2015
12:00 pm-1:30 pm


Best-selling author Patricia Harman will read from and discuss her latest book, The Reluctant Midwife, the story of a young nurse-midwife in West Virginia during the Great Depression. Harman, a certified nurse-midwife, is a former faculty member of Case Western Reserve University’s Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing. …Read more.

How to Retract an Article in the Humanities Wed. March 25th, 2015
12:00 pm-1:30 pm

A Baker-Nord Digital Humanities Event
 
There are significant differences between the kind of support that humanists typically provide for their arguments, on the one hand, and the kind of support scientists provide for their arguments, on the other. …Read more.

Making, Mining, Marking and Mashing: The Digital Humanities Curriculum in 2025 Wed. March 25th, 2015
4:30 pm-6:00 pm

A Baker-Nord Digital Humanities Event

Mills Kelly, Professor of History at George Mason University, will challenge the audience to think about what the humanities curriculum will look like ten years hence. …Read more.

Collectors, Collections and Museums: Chinese Ceramics in Britain, 1560-­‐1960 Wed. March 25th, 2015
6:30 pm-7:30 pm

During the 16th and 17th centuries, Chinese ceramics were acquired as objects of exoEca and vessels for the consumpEon of tea and coffee, as well as for display in the country house interior. …Read more.

Identity, Authority, and Authenticity in Language Policy: Reflections from the Peruvian Andes Mon. March 23rd, 2015
4:30 pm-6:00 pm

The Baker-Nord Center for the Humanities, the Speakers Committee of the Department of Modern Languages and Literatures, and the Program of Women’s and Gender Studies present this lecture by Virginia Zavala.   …Read more.

The Julius Fund Lecture in Medieval Art: Real Monsters: Medieval Belief, Wonder, and the “Wonders of the East” Wed. March 18th, 2015
5:30 pm-7:00 pm

Professor Asa Simon Mittman from California State University, Chico, will present the Julius Fund Lecture in Medieval Art, sponsored by the Department of Art History and Art.
 
A reception will follow. …Read more.

Faculty Work-in-Progress: Eteocles in the Hermeneutic Circle Mon. March 16th, 2015
4:30 pm-6:00 pm

Sophocles’ tragedy Oedipus the King is well-known. Few, however, know that Aeschylus wrote a dramatic trilogy about the family of Oedipus. Aeschylus’s The Seven against Thebes, the only surviving play from the trilogy, deals with Oedipus’ son Eteocles, who defends Thebes from an army of attackers led by his own brother Polyneices. …Read more.

On Not Reading David Foster Wallace Fri. March 6th, 2015
3:00 pm-4:00 pm

There are over fifty thousand novels published in the United States every year. Readers, reviewers, and scholars talk a lot about why one might read certain books; in this talk, Amy Hungerford, Professor of English at Yale University, asks how we decide, and how we talk about, what not to read in the context of literary over-production. …Read more.

The Long Now of Digital Humanities Thu. March 5th, 2015
4:30 pm-6:00 pm

A Baker-Nord Digital Humanities Event
 
 

Digital Humanities has been called “the culture of the perpetual prototype.” The fast pace of technological change makes it challenging to plan for the long-term future of digital projects, and yet a flourishing culture of digital scholarship demands that we balance the need for innovation against the need for stability and longevity. …Read more.

Introduction to Text Encoding with TEI Wed. March 4th, 2015
9:00 am-5:00 pm

A Baker-Nord Digital Humanities Event
 
The Workshop will run 4-6 March 2015. Participants should plan to attend all three days.
This event has ended.

This three-day workshop is designed for individuals who are contemplating embarking on a text-encoding project, or for those who would like to better understand the philosophy, theory, and practicalities of encoding in XML (Extensible Markup Language) using the Text Encoding Initiative (TEI) Guidelines. …Read more.

Performance and Discussion of “Asking for It” Tue. March 3rd, 2015
7:00 pm-9:00 pm

The Flora Stone Mather Center for Women, in collaboration with the Cleveland Rape Crisis Center presents Asking For It, which follows one woman’s hysterical and heart-breaking journey from “Outstanding Catholic Youth of the Year” to the stage of Radio City Music Hall and the cast of “A Chorus Line”. …Read more.

Neoliberal Practices and Cultural Production in Latin America in the Past 40 Years Fri. February 27th, 2015
5:00 pm-6:30 pm

PLEASE NOTE NEW LOCATION!
Idelber Avelar – a professor specializing in contemporary Latin American fiction, literary theory, and Cultural Studies at Tulane University – will address the effects of neoliberal practices in the production of culture, the transformation of state economies into transnational flow of goods, and how both of these factors have worked to position the discourse of memory as a new cultural and economic commodity. …Read more.

Lecture by Deborah Willis and Screening of “Through the Lens Darkly: Black Photographers and the Emergence of a People” Fri. February 27th, 2015
4:00 pm-7:00 pm

Deborah Willis, PhD is University Professor and Chair of the Department of Photography & Imaging at New York University/Tisch and has an affiliated appointment in Africana Studies.  She was a 2014 Richard D. …Read more.

NEH Grant Writing Workshop Wed. February 25th, 2015
9:00 am-12:30 pm

Stefanie Walker, Senior Program Officer for Research Programs at the National Endowment for the Humanities, will be on campus to provide information and answer questions about current NEH funding opportunities.   …Read more.

Freedman Fellows: Tornado Destruction & Financial Damage to Homeowners Wed. February 25th, 2015
12:00 pm-1:30 pm


A Digital Humanities Event
 
Dr. Gallagher will discuss his research, as well as the challenges it has presented and how the Freedman Fellows program provided both solutions and support. …Read more.

The Issa Lecture: Interspecies Ethics Tue. February 24th, 2015
4:30 pm-6:00 pm

Cynthia Willett, a Professor in the Department of Philosophy at Emory University, draws upon animal studies and relational ethics to propose transpecies ideals of communitarianism and cosmopolitan peace. Expanding our understanding of human and animal capacities begins with appreciating the capacity in ourselves and other animals for wonder and acts of moral beauty. …Read more.

Faculty Work-in-Progress: Honoring the Prophet, Performing American Islam Wed. February 18th, 2015
12:00 pm-1:30 pm

For centuries, Muslims have performed mawlids, or festivals and celebrations in honor of the Prophet Muhammad. These rituals came under attack in the twentieth-century, critiqued as either harmful innovations from early Islamic models or as superstitious practices incompatible with modernity. …Read more.

The Story of the Cleveland Play House Mon. February 16th, 2015
5:30 pm-8:00 pm


Founded in 1915, the Cleveland Play House remains the longest-running professional theatre in the country, but its history has never been studied by anyone outside of the institution itself. …Read more.

Chemistry in Art, Art in Chemistry, and the Spiritual Ground They Share Thu. February 12th, 2015
4:30 pm-6:00 pm


After looking at the evolution of pigments for the color blue, Roald Hoffmann – Frank H. T. Rhodes Professor of Humane Letters Emeritus at Cornell University and recipient of the 1981 Nobel Prize in Chemistry – will discuss how scientific articles relating to chemistry also deal with representation of an underlying reality, and face questions that are essentially artistic. …Read more.

Issues on 20th and 21st Century Art Wed. February 11th, 2015
5:00 pm-6:00 pm

Anuradha Vikram is a curator, critic, and educator, currently Director of Residency Programs at 18th Street Arts Center, in Santa Monica, CA. From her pedagogical and curatorial experience, Vikram will expand on the productive intersections of Art as Research, Arts as Engagement, and Art as Politics. …Read more.

Freedman Fellows Presentation: Tibet Oral History and Archive Project Wed. February 11th, 2015
12:00 pm-1:30 pm


A Digital Humanities Event
 
Dr. Goldstein will discuss his research, as well as the challenges it has presented and how the Freedman Fellows program provided both solutions and support. …Read more.

“Rockwell Kent” Screening and Discussion Mon. February 9th, 2015
5:00 pm-8:30 pm

Artist and social activist Rockwell Kent produced haunting landscapes inspired by his adventures in Alaska, Tierra del Fuego, and Greenland. For more than ten years, producer/writer Frederick Lewis, associate professor in the School of Media Arts and Studies at Ohio University, retraced the nomadic artist’s many travels, shooting footage in Greenland, Newfoundland, Alaska, Ireland, and Russia to produce this film, which documents how Kent’s travel experiences inspired his artistic work. …Read more.

Animating the War: The First World War and the History of Animation Thu. February 5th, 2015
4:30 pm-6:00 pm


The history of animation dates back to the 1890s, yet the medium as we know it was deeply shaped by the events of the First World War. In this talk, Donna Kornhaber – Assistant Professor of English at the University of Texas at Austin and author of numerous articles on the history of animation and the book Charlie Chaplin, Director – explores the role that the Great War played in the modern development of animation in terms of its subject matter, style, humor, and relationship to violence. …Read more.

Second Look Film Series: My Architect Mon. January 26th, 2015
6:00 pm-8:00 pm

This Oscar-nominated documentary features director Nathaniel Kahn searching to understand his father, noted architect Louis Kahn, who died bankrupt and alone in 1974. He explores his father’s past, interviewing architects such as Frank O. …Read more.

Humanities Graduate Student Happy Hour Thu. January 22nd, 2015
5:00 pm-7:00 pm

All Case Western Reserve University Graduate Students are invited to attend the first Baker-Nord Center Humanities Graduate Student Happy Hour.  Please join us for some snacks, a drink or two, and a chance to meet and network with graduate students from all of the CWRU humanities departments. …Read more.

Blackboard as a Digital Pedagogical Tool Thu. January 8th, 2015
9:00 am-12:00 pm

Free and open to the public, registration recommended. 

 
This essential workshop will explore tactics to effectively use Blackboard for teaching. In addition to offering participants a broad overview of the platform’s capacities, this workshop will provide hands on training in its use. …Read more.

An Introduction to DH Theory Tue. December 2nd, 2014
1:30 pm-1:00 pm

A Baker-Nord Digital Humanities Event
This talk will offer a general introduction to the theoretical debates in the field of digital humanities in addition to exploring some of the ways digital practitioners have used their skills and projects to advocate for the humanities across disciplines. …Read more.

Screening of “The Unknown Known” Mon. December 1st, 2014
1:00 pm-1:00 pm

Errol Morris’ documentary — a riveting extended interview with former Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld — is a cat-and-mouse game in which each player – interviewer & interviewee – thinks he’s the cat, making it both thrilling and disconcerting to watch. …Read more.

Faculty Work-in-Progress: Electric Baton: Science, Sound, and the Romantic Conductor Thu. November 20th, 2014
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

Hector Berlioz — along with Louis Spohr and Felix Mendelssohn — is often cited as the first of the modern conductors, a larger-than-life figure at once magisterial, quasi-magical and military. …Read more.

DH in the Classroom: A Primer Tue. November 18th, 2014
1:00 am-1:00 am

A Baker-Nord Digital Humanities Event
In this general discussion and presentation of a broad range of digital humanist tools, this workshop will offer instructors, faculty and graduate students an overview of technology that can be integrated into humanist pedagogy. …Read more.

Metamorphoses of Medea Fri. November 14th, 2014
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

 
A Baker-Nord Cosponsored Event
 
“Killer!” “Barbarian!” “Witch!” “Madwoman!” “Heroine!” Ever since Euripides staged his drama Medea in 431 BCE Athens — a play about marital passion, betrayal, and explosive revenge — the character of Medea has been called all these names and much more. …Read more.

Exhibits & Collections Thu. November 13th, 2014
1:00 am-1:00 pm

A Co-presented Digital Humanities Event
A general introduction for students, faculty, and staff to the processes of digitizing text and images, building collections/exhibits/archives using the Omeka platform, and writing Dublin Core metadata for the items contained therein. …Read more.

The Richard N. Campen Lecture in Architecture and Sculpture: Across Art and Architecture Thu. November 13th, 2014
1:00 am-1:00 am

Using examples from her own creative practice, Monica Ponce de Leon, Dean and Eliel Saarinen Collegiate Professor of Architecture and Urban and Regional Planning at the University of Michigan, will discuss the ever-shifting relationship between artistic production and the architectural project. …Read more.

Shakespeare in America Wed. November 5th, 2014
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

Shakespeare has played a significant role in American literary and political culture since the time of the Revolution. Drawing upon his recent anthology for the Library of America — “Shakespeare in America”– James Shapiro, Larry Miller Professor of English and Comparative Literature at Columbia University, considers the alternative history of our nation conveyed in the work of representative American authors, exploring how Shakespeare has served a means to confront some of the issues that have long divided us as a nation. …Read more.

What Can We Learn about Language by Reading Millions of Books? Thu. October 30th, 2014
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

A Faculty Works-In-Progress
The dramatic growth of linguistic corpora enables the quantitative study of language on a scale that would have been unimaginable even five years ago. In this talk, Harsh Mathur, Associate Professor of Physics, will describe what we might learn about the evolution of language from such studies, using the regularization of verbs as a concrete example. …Read more.

Digital Project Management Fri. October 24th, 2014
12:30 pm-3 pm

A Baker-Nord Digital Humanities Event
This presentation will propose a transformation of the digital humanities so that innovations are sociological and not only technical. Martha Nell Smith — Distinguished Scholar-Teacher and Professor of English at the University of Maryland and Founding Director of the Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities — will offer critical observations re digital archives related to the poems of Emily Dickinson. …Read more.

TEI Without Tech: An Introduction to TEI Concepts Thu. October 23rd, 2014
1 pm-3 pm

A Baker-Nord Digital Humanities Event
 
Text encoding allows researchers to closely explore texts using the XML mark-up language. Prior to processing the works they want to examine, tagging parts of speech, themes, places, characters, historical figures and more, scholars work to understand the key questions that undergird material texts as they are transformed into machine readable data. …Read more.

Visibility, Exclusion, and Futures of Digital Humanities: Time for a Thaw Thu. October 23rd, 2014
6 pm-7 pm

 
 
 
A Baker-Nord Digital Humanities Event
This presentation will propose a transformation of the digital humanities so that innovations are sociological and not only technical. Martha Nell Smith — Distinguished Scholar-Teacher and Professor of English at the University of Maryland and Founding Director of the Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities — will offer critical observations re digital archives related to the poems of Emily Dickinson. …Read more.

I Do and I Don’t: A Discussion of Marriage in the Movies Mon. October 13th, 2014
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

As long as there have been feature movies there have been marriage movies, and yet Hollywood has always been cautious about how to label them–perhaps because, unlike any other genre of film, the marriage movie resonates directly with the experience of almost every adult coming to see it. …Read more.

What is College For? Thu. October 2nd, 2014
4:30 pm-5:30 pm


Educators at all levels–from early childhood through college and university– are contending with rising public anxiety about the cost and value of education. Andrew Delbanco, Director of American Studies and Julian Clarence Levi Professor in the Humanities at Columbia University and author of College: What it Was, Is, and Should Be?, will speak about the past, present, and future of a distinctive institution that is under growing pressure: the American college. …Read more.

Screening of “The Square” Mon. September 22nd, 2014
6 pm-8 pm

A nominee for best documentary feature at the 2014 Oscars, The Square is an immersive experience, transporting the viewer deep into the intense emotional drama of the ongoing Egyptian Revolution. …Read more.

An Afternoon with Anthony Marra Wed. September 10th, 2014
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

Author Anthony Marra will read from and discuss “A Constellation of Vital Phenomena”, winner of the 2014 Anisfield-Wolf Book Award for fiction. His novel – set in a nearly abandoned hospital in war-torn Chechnya – tells the story of eight-year-old girl Havaa, the neighbor who rescues her after her father’s disappearance, and Sonia, the doctor who shelters her over five dramatic days in December 2004. …Read more.

The Lives of Others: The Novel as a Looking Glass Sat. May 31st, 2014
8:45 am-10:00 am

A Baker-Nord Cosponsored Event
Thrity Umrigar is an award-winning journalist and author of five novels and a memoir. Her newest novel, The Story Hour, will be published in 2014. …Read more.

The Protean Virgil: Book History and the Reception of Aeneid 1 in the Renaissance Fri. April 25th, 2014
1:00 pm-1:00 pm

VERGIL WEEK – A Baker-Nord Cosponsored Event
This talk will focus on how the beginning of the Aeneid was read in the Renaissance. The emphasis will not be on Virgilian influence on the great writers of the period, but on how the poem was read at school, to provide a part of the common cultural foundation of the early modern period. …Read more.

Unworkable Hermeneutics Thu. April 24th, 2014
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

A Baker-Nord Digital Humanities Event
Digital Humanities scholarship, among other things, is focused on the question of interpretation. Most notable in initiatives such as topic modeling, where algorithms are employed to identify unnoticed patterns in texts or time periods, hermeneutics (the study of interpretation) dominates one facet of Digital Humanities thinking. …Read more.

Rockwell Kent and Greenland Thu. April 17th, 2014
1:00 am-1:00 am

A Humanities Related Event
Painter, author, illustrator, adventurer, social activist, ROCKWELL KENT (1882-1971) was one of America’s most influential and important artists reaching his greatest popularity during the 1930’s and 1940’s. …Read more.

Mapping Ibuse Masuji’s “Kuroe Ame” Wed. April 16th, 2014
1:00 pm-1:00 pm

A Freedman Fellows Presentation
Since the atomic bombing on August 6, 1945, the name “Hiroshima” has come to signify less the name of a city than an unthinkable event or an incalculable fear of nuclear war. …Read more.

Biotechnical Ecologies: Lively Participation in the Contemporary City Tue. April 15th, 2014
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

A Baker-Nord Faculty Works-in-Progress
City space is fast becoming the central playground for the experiential, political and ideological forces shaping lives and discourses both within the specific boundaries of urban centers, and across the globe. …Read more.

What’s on TV? Mon. April 7th, 2014
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

What are we watching when we watch television? What are the conditions of possibility — economic, technical, and aesthetic — that have changed the medium in the 21st century? …Read more.

Poetry in the Museum: The Nature of Nature Sun. April 6th, 2014
1:30 pm-3:00 pm

A Baker-Nord Cosponsored Event
In a thought-provoking afternoon at the Cleveland Museum of Natural History, a panel of nationally recognized poets will address the “Nature of Nature”. Before the discussion/ reading, the guest poets will announce the winners of the 2014 Poetry in the Museum contest, who will read their winning poems. …Read more.

“Interpreting Capitalism” Film Series: INSIDE JOB Thu. April 3rd, 2014
1:00 pm-1:00 pm

2010 Oscar Winner for Best Documentary, “Inside Job” provides a comprehensive analysis of the global financial crisis of 2008, which at a cost over $20 trillion, caused millions of people to lose their jobs and homes in the worst recession since the Great Depression, and nearly resulted in a global financial collapse. …Read more.

Return to the River: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Rivers in World Literature Wed. April 2nd, 2014
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

A Baker-Nord Cosponsored Event
This meeting of the Interdisciplinary World Literature Colloquium will reprise and expand the topic of Charles Burroughs’s January 2014 lecture on rivers in world literature. Discussion will focus on poems and prose in Greek, Latin, French, English, and Italian as well as on selected artworks. …Read more.

Rose Wohlgemuth Weisman Women’s Voices Lecture: A Conversation with Jane Smiley Mon. March 31st, 2014
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

This event features a conversation with Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist and essayist Jane Smiley. Her novels include “A Thousand Acres”, “Moo”,”The All True Travels and Adventures of Lidie Newton”, “Horse Heaven” and “Private Life”. …Read more.

Public Libraries in the Digital Age Thu. March 27th, 2014
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

Sari Feldman — for the past ten years the Executive Director of Cuyahoga County Public Library (CCPL) — will discuss both how digital technologies are impacting American public libraries and how budget & demographic shifts are creating challenges for these libraries that are busier and more relevant than ever. …Read more.

Creating a Digital Database on High-altitude Human Biology Wed. March 19th, 2014
1:00 pm-1:00 pm

A Freedman Fellows Presentation
Kelvin Smith Library will host a presentation by 2013 Freedman Fellow, Dr. Cynthia Beall (Distinguished University Professor, Anthropology). Dr. Beall will discuss the challenges and solutions related to her research, and how they were addressed by the Freedman Fellows Program and its corresponding support. …Read more.

Speech, Gesture, Bodily Stance, Graphics, Music, and Media: Studying Multimodal Communication in a Massive Dataset Tue. March 18th, 2014
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

A Baker-Nord Faculty Work-in-Progress
Human communication is multimodal, involving language, co-speech gesture, interpersonal interaction, audiovisual components, media, and technology. Our views of traditional texts have only just begun to include examples of multimodal communication. …Read more.

“An End to the Neglect of the Problems of the Negro Woman!”: Black Women Communists of the Old Left and Critical Perspectives on Global Capitalism Thu. March 6th, 2014
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

Dr. McDuffie, Associate Professor in the Departments of African American Studies and History at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, examines the ways black women in the US Communist Party (CPUSA) of the Old Left period (1919-1956) forged a ground-breaking radical black feminist praxis that challenged orthodox Marxist framings of capitalism through centering race and gender to their political thought and activism. …Read more.

What Happiness Is Wed. March 5th, 2014
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

H. Friedl is an acclaimed film director whose documentaries are regularly shown on Austrian public tv. He was granted permission to accompany a team of government agents as they travelled to the remotest hamlets in the Himalayas. …Read more.

Why Does the World Exist? An Existential Detective Story: A Book Discussion Mon. March 3rd, 2014
1:00 pm-1:00 pm

Why Does the World Exist? An Existential Detective Story by Jim Holt (Liveright 2012) takes up the history and contemporary thinking about what is arguably the most profound question of all in physics and its philosophy. …Read more.

Morally Arbitrary Economic Advantage Thu. February 27th, 2014
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

In this lecture, Frank Thompson, Lecturer and Research Investigator at the University of Michigan, will offer an introductory analysis of the notion of morally arbitrary advantage, focusing on morally arbitrary economic advantage (and disadvantage). …Read more.

Monty Python and Philosophy Wed. February 26th, 2014
1:00 pm-1:00 pm

Thompson disagrees that “Philosophy [is] on the whole no laughing matter.” — W.V.O. Quine, Quiddities. To formally register his disagreement, Thompson will lead a fun discussion on the oeuvres of Monty Python’s Flying Circus, e.g., “Dead Parrot” (Episode 8), “Argument Clinic” (Episode 29), and their movie “The Meaning of Life”, along with selections from Hardcastle and Reich’s (2006) “Monty Python and Philosophy: Nudge Nudge, Think Think”. …Read more.

Cold Case?: Postcolonial Philosophy in France Wed. February 26th, 2014
5:30 pm-6:30 pm

A Humanities Related Event
When postcolonial studies arose in the English-speaking world, India was the paradigm case. But what does postcolonial mean in the French-speaking world, whose primary case is Algeria? …Read more.

Neither Here Nor There: A translation workshop on French philosophy from the Caribbean Tue. February 25th, 2014
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

A Humanities Related Event
Faculty and students are invited to join Dr. Seloua Luste Boublina in discussing texts that straddle cultural, linguistic, psychological, and even musical genres by philosophers Frantz Fanon and Lewis Gordon. …Read more.

Slave Flight, Slave Torture, and the State: Nineteenth-Century French Guiana Mon. February 24th, 2014
1:00 pm-1:00 pm

A Humanities Related Event
Miranda Spieler is an historian of France and the French overseas empire whose work explores the relationship between law and violence. She received her AB in History and Literature from Harvard College and her Ph.D. …Read more.

A Deeper, Older O: The Oral (Sex) Tradition (in Poetry) Thu. February 20th, 2014
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

A Baker-Nord Cosponsored Event
A part of the Baker Nord Poetics Working-Group’s Spring 2014 programming, poet Jennifer Moxley will lead a discussion of her essay “A Deeper, Older O: The Oral (Sex) Tradition (in Poetry).”
 

About the speaker
Jennifer Moxley

Jennifer Moxley (b. …Read more.

Immigration, Inc. Thu. February 20th, 2014
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

Journalist & author Jeffrey Kaye discusses the economic forces that promote and encourage immigration. The public in the U.S. and other industrialized countries tend to view the politically-charged topic through a legal lens, often seeing migration as a matter of personal choice. …Read more.

From the Tigris to the Tiber: A Case of Babylonian ‘Astro-Medicine’ in Pliny the Elder Wed. February 19th, 2014
1:00 pm-1:00 pm

A Baker-Nord Cosponsored Event
This talk will present and compare two texts — a puzzling late Babylonian Kalendertext written on a cuneiform tablet in Uruk by a scholar named Iqisa (late fourth century BCE), and a passage from the Natural History of Pliny the Elder (first century CE) concerning fever therapies. …Read more.

Mountain Visions: Modernism and Dystopia in the Alps Wed. February 19th, 2014
4:30 pm-1:00 pm

A Baker-Nord Cosponsored Event
Talk 1: “Modernist Motion on the Mountainside: Alpine Skiing and Central European Culture, 1900-39 Andrew Denning, History, University of British Columbia
When does a pastime become an art form? …Read more.

“Interpreting Capitalism” Film Series: THE LAST TRAIN HOME Thu. February 13th, 2014
1:00 pm-1:00 pm

Every spring, China’s cities are plunged into chaos as 130 million migrant workers journey to their home villages for the New Year’s holiday: an epic spectacle that reveals a country tragically caught between its rural past and industrial future. …Read more.

The Making of Albert Camus’ “The Stranger” Mon. February 10th, 2014
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

The Stranger was published in 1942, in the depths of the Nazi Occupation, by a young unemployed journalist from Algeria who would normally never have had a hearing in Paris. …Read more.

Alterity Revisited: Recent Projects Thu. February 6th, 2014
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

A Baker-Nord Digital Humanities Event
Jose Carlos Teixeira — the Champney Family Professor of Art, CWRU & Cleveland Institute of Art — will present his recent interdisciplinary and multi-media-based research explorations. …Read more.

The Crisis of Journalism and the Conversion of the United States from a Democracy to a Dollarocracy Mon. January 27th, 2014
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

The United States is no longer a “functional democracy,” according to Jimmy Carter. The wealthy dominate politics and the rest of the population are sitting in the bleachers for a game at which they’re mere spectators. …Read more.

The Speaking River: Voices In and From the Urban Landscape Thu. January 23rd, 2014
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

A Baker-Nord Cosponsor Event
Rivers are often background, especially within city limits. In modern cities, formerly obstreperous rivers have been channeled and generally domesticated by embankments and weirs, and condemned to carry tourist craft and little else. …Read more.

Issues in 20th and 21st Century Art: Lize Mogel Wed. January 22nd, 2014
5:00 pm-6:00 pm

A Humanities Related Event
Lize Mogel is an interdisciplinary artist who works with the interstices between art and cultural geography. She has created and disseminated counter-cartography maps and mapping that produce new understandings of social and political issues. …Read more.

Lee Daniels’ The Butler: Film Screening and Discussion Tue. January 21st, 2014
1:00 pm-1:00 pm

A Baker-Nord Cosponsored Event
A 2013 American historical fiction drama film directed by Lee Daniels is loosely inspired by the real-life of Eugene Allen, an African-American who eyewitnesses notable events of the 20th century during his 34-year tenure serving as a White House butler to eight presidents over three decades. …Read more.

Euripides’s Hecuba: A Political Interpretation Fri. January 17th, 2014
1:00 pm-1:00 pm

A Baker-Nord Cosponsored Event
Much of the criticism on Euripides’s Hecuba is focused on the character of Hecuba as victimized mother who rightfully avenges her son’s death and those who argue for Hecuba’s moral deterioration over the course of the plays’ two main movements, sacrifice and revenge. …Read more.

Pearl Harbor: Sneak Attack or Provocation? Thu. December 5th, 2013
4:15 pm-1:00 pm

A Humanities-Related Event
In America the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor has been interpreted as a cowardly sneak attack by an evil enemy on an innocent America. But what if FDR provoked, even unnecessarily, Japan’s attack on Pearl Harbor? …Read more.

Hired Education: Capitalism and the Academic Community Wed. November 20th, 2013
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

Historian Ellen Schrecker presents a perspective on how and why the leaders of American universities embraced the corporate mindset that had come to dominate the neoliberal political climate of the late 20th century. …Read more.

Politics in Early Eighteenth-Century Britian: Why Handel was Fired and Other Stories Mon. November 18th, 2013
7:30 pm-8:30 pm

A Baker-Nord Cosponsored Event
When Handel arrived in London, he was in the employ of the Elector of Hanover, Georg Ludwig, who was heir to the throne of Great Britain. The current monarch Queen Anne welcomed Handel at court, and the composer quickly began composing works for ceremonial court occasions. …Read more.

From Russia to Cleveland: Politics, Sports & the LGBT Experience Fri. November 15th, 2013
12:30 pm-1:00 pm

Join the Panel Discussion looking a the Russia/Winter Olympics situation as it relates to politics and the LGBT community. Learn about the GG (Gay Games 2014) held in Cleveland, and explore how global thinking at a local level has been incorporated into preparing to host athletes and visitors from all over the country and the world. …Read more.

The Falling Rate of Profit: Karl Marx’s Struggle to Prove the Demise of Capitalism Thu. November 14th, 2013
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

Although never explicitly mentioned in Vol. 1 of Capital, the idea of a falling rate of profit was central to Karl Marx’s understanding of both the workings of capitalism and to what he expected to be its ultimate demise. …Read more.

Emerging Methodologies: An Introduction to the Field of Digital Humanities Tue. November 12th, 2013
1:00 pm-1:00 pm

 
 
A Baker-Nord Digital Humanities Event
 
Allison Schifani, Baker-Nord Center Postdoctoral Scholar in the Digital Humanities, presents an informal introduction to the field. This talk will provide a broad overview of emerging methodologies for research and teaching across the humanities. …Read more.

Interpreting Capitalism Film Series: Garbage Dreams Mon. November 11th, 2013
1:00 pm-1:00 pm

On the outskirts of Cairo lies the world’s largest garbage village, home to 60,000 Zaballeen–Arabic for garbage people. The Zaballeen have survived for centuries by recycling Cairo waste. …Read more.

American Glamour: Modern Architecture, Marketing, and Popular Culture in the 1950s Thu. November 7th, 2013
1:00 pm-1:00 pm

Alice T. Friedman–the Grace Slack McNeil Professor of American Art at Wellesley College–will examine key examples of Mid-century Modern architecture in the United States, focusing on the ways in which buildings and interiors came to reflect the forms, narrative structures, and emotional appeal of mass-market media such as advertising, fashion photography, film and television. …Read more.

An Afternoon with Nikki Giovanni Mon. October 28th, 2013
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

Join The Baker-Nord Center and our guest, Nikki Giovanni, as she reads and discusses her works. Many of Giovanni’s books have received honors and awards. Her autobiography, Gemini, was a finalist for the National Book Award; Love Poems, Blues: For All the Changes, Quilting the Black-Eyed Pea, Acolytes, and Hip Hop Speaks to Children were all honored with NAACP Image Awards. …Read more.

Improvisation and Transgression: Musicians of the Harem Thu. October 24th, 2013
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

The Western perception of the harem, or women’s quarters, and assumptions about the residents and their lifestyle remains a persistent Orientalist fantasy. Professor Nielson–the Anisfield-Wolf SAGES Fellow–will share her research regarding how, even in those cultures with seemingly inflexible rules regarding gender segregation, musicians had the unique ability to negotiate both physical and social boundaries surrounding the harem. …Read more.

The Historical and the Metaphysical in George Oppens’ “Route” Fri. October 18th, 2013
1:00 pm-3:30 pm

Robert Baker’s fields of interest are modern poetry from the romantic period through the present, twentieth-century and contemporary literature, and the relationships among literature, philosophy, and religion. His first book, “The Extravagant: Crossings of Modern Poetry and Modern Philosophy,” includes detailed discussions of Kant, Wordsworth, Lyotard, Rimbaud, Nietzsche, Bataille, Kierkegaard, Dickinson, Mallarme, and Derrida. …Read more.

History in Fiction: Reading the Novels of Nobel Laureate Mo Yan Thu. October 17th, 2013
4:30 pm-1:00 pm

Controversies about Chinese writer Mo Yan have been heated since last October, when the Swedish Academy announced him to be the winner of the Nobel Prize in Literature for his work “with hallucinatory realism merging folk tales, history and the contemporary.” The most recent debate was aroused by German Sinologist Wolfgang Kubin, who commented at a May conference in Hong Kong: “I cannot come to a thorough understanding of post-1911 Chinese history through his fiction.” In response to the criticism, this lecture investigates Mo Yan’s fictional historiography by focusing on four of his thirteen novels, namely “Red Sorghum” (1987), “Big Breasts and Wide Hips” (1996), “Sandalwood Death” (2001), and “Life and Death Are Wearing Me Out” (2006). …Read more.

Interpreting Capitalism Film Series: The Queen of Versailles Mon. October 14th, 2013
1:00 pm-1:00 pm

A whimsical documentary that offers an off-center view of a billionaire couple as they begin construction on a mansion inspired by the French palace of Versailles. The film chronicles how their empire–fueled by the real estate bubble and cheap money–falters due to the economic crisis. …Read more.

Rarely Seen Gems of the Japanese Cinema (with English subtitles): Growing Up (Takekurabe, 1955) Sat. October 12th, 2013
1:00 pm-1:00 pm

This film was directed by Heinosuke Gosho and is part of a series curated by Linda C. Ehrlich and John Ewing in celebration of the reopening of the Japanese and Korean Art Galleries at the Cleveland Museum of Art. …Read more.

Rarely Seen Gems of the Japanese Cinema (with English subtitles): Humanity and Paper Balloons (Ninjo kami fusen, 1937) Sat. October 5th, 2013
1:00 am-1:00 am

This film was directed by Sadao Yamanaka and is part of a series curated by Linda C. Ehrlich and John Ewing in celebration of the reopening of the Japanese and Korean Art Galleries at the Cleveland Museum of Art. …Read more.

Rarely Seen Gems of the Japanese Cinema (with English subtitles): Record of a Tenement Gentleman (Nagaya shinshiroku, 1947) Thu. October 3rd, 2013
6:30 pm-8:30 pm

This film was directed by Yasujiro Ozu and is part of a series curated by Linda C. Ehrlich and John Ewing in celebration of the reopening of the Japanese and Korean Art Galleries at the Cleveland Museum of Art. …Read more.

High Tech, Low Life Wed. October 2nd, 2013
1:00 pm-1:00 pm

This award-winning documentary follows two of China’s first citizen reporters as they travel through the country, chronicling underreported news and social issues stories. Using laptops, cell phones, and digital cameras to micro-blog the stories and issues shaping contemporary Chinese life, they challenge conventional definitions of journalism and provoke discussion about what freedom of press means in the face of China’s evolving censorship. …Read more.

UNIVERSITY CIRCLE: CREATING A SENSE OF PLACE: Film Premier and Panel Discussion Mon. September 30th, 2013
5:30 pm-1:00 pm

The Baker-Nord Center is proud to present the public premier of a new documentary film on the history, public art, and architecture of University Circle. The screening will be followed by a panel discussing “Hidden Stories: National Models” with representation from the Free Clinic, Hessler Street and Magnolia House. …Read more.

Rarely Seen Gems of the Japanese Cinema (with English subtitles): Miss Oyu (Oyusama, 1951) Sat. September 28th, 2013
1:00 pm-1:00 pm

A Baker-Nord Cosponsored Event
This film was directed by Kenji Mizoguchi and is part of a series curated by Linda C. Ehrlich and John Ewing in celebration of the reopening of the Japanese and Korean Art Galleries at the Cleveland Museum of Art. …Read more.

Regional Poets on Poetry: A general discussion of selected poems Fri. September 27th, 2013
1:00 pm-1:00 pm

Award-winning regional poets Frank Giampietro, David Young, and Joy Katz will discuss trends in contemporary poetry by examining representative texts in this panel presentation that kicks off this Fall’s Baker-Nord Poetics Working Group programming. …Read more.

An Inner History of Collecting Chinese Painting for Cleveland: Sherman E. Lee and Walter Hochstadter Thu. September 26th, 2013
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

A Baker-Nord Center Faculty Work-in-Progress
Sherman E. Lee (1918-2008), Cleveland Museum of Art director and curator of “Oriental” art, emerged as one of the most successful institutional collectors of Chinese painting in the 1950s and 1960s. …Read more.

Scholarly Publishing Today Tue. September 24th, 2013
12:30 pm-1:30 pm

Scholars at every stage, from graduate school to retirement, face an overwhelming array of choices concerning publication of their scholarship. The landscape of research, teaching, and publishing continues to change, and part of a successful career as a scholar involves understanding the most rational choices for publishing and disseminating ones work. …Read more.

The Yellow Birds: A Reading and Discussion with Kevin Powers Wed. September 11th, 2013
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

A Baker-Nord Center Cosponsored Event
Author Kevin Powers will read from and discuss The Yellow Birds, winner of the 2013 Anisfield-Wolf Book Award for fiction. The Yellow Birds focuses on the last weeks of friendship between 18-year-old Private Daniel Murphy and 21-year-old Private John Bartle, who makes a rash promise to Mrs. …Read more.


Page last modified: January 7, 2015