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Baker-Nord Center for the Humanities

Baker-Nord Center for the Humanities

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Upcoming Events

Talking Back to the Book: Critical Digital Literacies in African American Rhetorical Traditions

Date: Wed. April 1st, 2015, 4:30 pm-6:00 pm
Location: Clark Hall Room 309, 11130 Bellflower Road

Talking Book Image

In this talk, Adam Banks, Professor of Writing Rhetoric and Digital Studies at the University of Kentucky, will consider Stevie Wonder’s exploration of technologies in his pursuit of artistic independence from Motown in the early 1970s as an invocation and deployment of the Talking Book, a trope of literacy for freedom emerging from Black oral traditions.  He will argue that the Talking Book offers educators and community builders a framework for a critical digital literacy that helps us understand contemporary African American engagements with technologies like Twitter and can inform work with technologies in schools and community spaces. […Read more]

Cultural Waves: The Ancient Greek Contribution to Human Rights

Date: Thu. April 2nd, 2015, 4:00 pm-5:00 pm
Location: Clark Hall Room 206

The U.S. government’s use of “enhanced interrogation techniques” since 9/11 has made the topic of basic human rights newly urgent. Professor Sternberg suggests that human rights concepts arose from humane discourse that developed in “cultural waves.” Through close philological work on ancient pity, Greek oiktos and eleos, she discovered that Athenians of the classical period (the 5th and 4th centuries BCE) invented humane values, even though they conspicuously failed to live up to them. […Read more]

The 2015 biennial Beamer-Schneider Lecture in Ethics & Civics: “There is a crack in everything; that’s how the light gets through”

Date: Tue. April 7th, 2015, 6:00 pm-7:00 pm
Location: Clark Hall Room 309

This lecture is presented by Michael Rakowitz who will discuss his social experiments categorized as “social practice art.” He will also be starting his project in Cleveland centered around the Tamir Rice killing: the redaction of orange. Details to follow.
Rakowitz is an internationally renowned artist at the forefront of social practice art. His projects on Palestine, Iraq, veterans, and homelessness have led him to shows in the Tate Modern, London, MoMA in New York City, […Read more]

Reading Interfaces: Inquiries at the Intersection of Literature and Technology

Date: Wed. April 8th, 2015, 4:00 pm-7:30 pm
Location: Kelvin Smith Library, 1st Floor Clapp Reading Room - 11055 Euclid Ave., Cleveland OH 44106

elit

A Baker-Nord Digital Humanities Event
Curated by Kristine Kelly and Allison Schifani

Free and open to the public, registration recommended. 
Electronic literature presents and generates literary performances that display, question, and critique ways of reading and modes of literary production in the digital age. This exhibition of electronic literature will display and discuss works of electronic and print literature and bring to attention the technologies central to their production. The accompanying colloquium will include public presentations on the history of the book, […Read more]

Reading Interfaces: Inquiries at the Intersection of Literature and Technology

Date: Thu. April 9th, 2015, 12:00 pm-7:00 pm
Location: Kelvin Smith Library, 1st Floor Clapp Reading Room - 11055 Euclid Ave., Cleveland OH 44106

elit

A Baker-Nord Digital Humanities Event
Curated by Kristine Kelly and Allison Schifani

Free and open to the public, registration recommended. 
Electronic literature presents and generates literary performances that display, question, and critique ways of reading and modes of literary production in the digital age. This exhibition of electronic literature will display and discuss works of electronic and print literature and bring to attention the technologies central to their production. The accompanying colloquium will include public presentations on the history of the book, […Read more]

The Joseph and Violet Magyar Lecture in Hungarian Studies: Counter-Constitutions: How a 21st Century Constitutional Revolution in Hungary Claimed Medieval Roots

Date: Thu. April 9th, 2015, 4:30 pm-6:00 pm
Location: Clark Hall Room 309, 11130 Bellflower Road

St. Stephen Crown

Since independence in 1989, nationalist Hungarians have argued that the Holy Crown of St. Stephen and associated doctrines should be at the core of Hungary’s constitution. Kim Lane Scheppele – Rockefeller Professor of Sociology and International Affairs at Princeton University – will discuss how the Crown is both a literal object given by the Pope to the first Christian king of Hungary, in the year 1000 and – since medieval times – a key symbolic touchstone in the constitution of state power. […Read more]

Reading Interfaces: Inquiries at the Intersection of Literature and Technology

Date: Fri. April 10th, 2015, 11:00 am-5:00 pm
Location: Kelvin Smith Library, 1st Floor Clapp Reading Room - 11055 Euclid Ave., Cleveland OH 44106

elit

A Baker-Nord Digital Humanities Event
Curated by Kristine Kelly and Allison Schifani

Free and open to the public, registration recommended. 
Electronic literature presents and generates literary performances that display, question, and critique ways of reading and modes of literary production in the digital age. This exhibition of electronic literature will display and discuss works of electronic and print literature and bring to attention the technologies central to their production. The accompanying colloquium will include public presentations on the history of the book, […Read more]

The 2015 Edward S. and Melinda Melton Sadar Lecture in Writing in the Disciplines – Form, Subject, and Genre: Toward a History of Copyright for Newspaper and Magazine Writings

Date: Fri. April 10th, 2015, 3:00 pm-4:00 pm
Location: Moot Court Room (A59), Case Western Reserve University School of Law

With respect to copyright law, periodicals have followed a different trajectory than books, and much of that difference has to do with the heterogeneous nature of newspapers and magazines. In the early twentieth century, periodicals in the United States and Great Britain obtained blanket copyrights that covered most of their contents, but this logic did not apply to the much more fluid textual universe of the nineteenth century. The timing of the first copyright claims, and the extent to which these claims were respected, […Read more]

2015 F. Joseph Callahan Distinguished Lecture: “The Flight From Conversation”

Date: Mon. April 13th, 2015, 6:00 pm-7:00 pm
Location: Tinkham Veale University Center Ballroom, 11038 Bellflower Road

Turkle Image

2015 Callahan Distinguished Lecture presents professor, author, clinical psychologist Sherry Turkle on how technology is shaping our relationships
With personal communication dominated by texts, tweets and online posts, some wonder if social technology has hollowed out what it means to be social—that we are losing the art of conversation with disturbing consequences.
Sherry Turkle, a professor, author and licensed clinical psychologist, has spent the last 30 years researching the psychology of people’s relationships with technology and, […Read more]

Who Started World War I? Centenary Debates about War Guilt and Meaning

Date: Wed. April 15th, 2015, 4:30 pm-6:00 pm
Location: Clark Hall Room 309, 11130 Bellflower Road

WWIImage

A Niagara of new histories has greeted the centenary of the outbreak of World War I, and none more impressive or widely-read than Christopher Clark, Sleepwalkers: How Europe Went to War in 1914 (Harper, 2013). In his very title, Clark paints a portrait of European statesmen asleep at the wheel, stumbling blindly into a war that waking people would have avoided. The logic of this interpretation spreads responsibility for the mis-steps that led to war evenly among all participants, […Read more]