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Baker-Nord Center for the Humanities

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Upcoming Events

Introduction to Text Encoding with TEI

Date: Wed. March 4th, 2015, 9:00 am-5:00 pm
Location: Tinkham Veale University Center - Senior Classroom (Room 134) - 11038 Bellflower Road, Cleveland, OH 44106

TEI

A Baker-Nord Digital Humanities Event
 
The Workshop will run 4-6 March 2015. Participants should plan to attend all three days.
Registration required, SEATING LIMITED. 

This three-day workshop is designed for individuals who are contemplating embarking on a text-encoding project, or for those who would like to better understand the philosophy, theory, and practicalities of encoding in XML (Extensible Markup Language) using the Text Encoding Initiative (TEI) Guidelines. […Read more]

The Long Now of Digital Humanities

Date: Thu. March 5th, 2015, 4:30 pm-6:00 pm
Location: Clark Hall Room 206 - 11130 Bellflower Rd., Cleveland OH 44106

Flanders-perpetual-prototype

A Baker-Nord Digital Humanities Event
 
 

Digital Humanities has been called “the culture of the perpetual prototype.” The fast pace of technological change makes it challenging to plan for the long-term future of digital projects, and yet a flourishing culture of digital scholarship demands that we balance the need for innovation against the need for stability and longevity. This presentation will consider the Women Writers Project as an example of a very long-term digital publication and research project, […Read more]

On Not Reading David Foster Wallace

Date: Fri. March 6th, 2015, 3:00 pm-4:00 pm
Location: Clark Hall Room 206, 11130 Bellflower Road

There are over fifty thousand novels published in the United States every year. Readers, reviewers, and scholars talk a lot about why one might read certain books; in this talk, Amy Hungerford, Professor of English at Yale University, asks how we decide, and how we talk about, what not to read in the context of literary over-production. She takes as a case study the decision not to read a work that is newly becoming canonized—David Foster Wallace’s Infitine Jest. […Read more]

Faculty Work-in-Progress: Eteocles in the Hermeneutic Circle

Date: Mon. March 16th, 2015, 4:30 pm-6:00 pm
Location: Clark Hall Room 206, 11130 Bellflower Road

Wutrich_WiP

Sophocles’ tragedy Oedipus the King is well-known. Few, however, know that Aeschylus wrote a dramatic trilogy about the family of Oedipus. Aeschylus’s The Seven against Thebes, the only surviving play from the trilogy, deals with Oedipus’ son Eteocles, who defends Thebes from an army of attackers led by his own brother Polyneices. Eteocles, like Oedipus, is unable to understand his part in the complex matrix of life. In this talk, Timothy Wutrich, an instructor in the Department of Classics, […Read more]

The Julius Fund Lecture in Medieval Art: Real Monsters: Medieval Belief, Wonder, and the “Wonders of the East”

Date: Wed. March 18th, 2015, 5:30 pm-7:00 pm
Location: Tinkham Veale University Center, Ballroom C

Mittman Poster

Professor Asa Simon Mittman from California State University, Chico, will present the Julius Fund Lecture in Medieval Art, sponsored by the Department of Art History and Art.
 
A reception will follow. […Read more]

Identity, Authority, and Authenticity in Language Policy: Reflections from the Peruvian Andes

Date: Mon. March 23rd, 2015, 4:30 pm-6:00 pm
Location: Clark Hall Room 309, 11130 Bellflower Road

Zavala Image

The Baker-Nord Center for the Humanities, the Speakers Committee of the Department of Modern Languages and Literatures, and the Program of Women’s and Gender Studies present this lecture by Virginia Zavala.  Zavala is a Professor in the Department of Humanities (Linguistics Section) at Pontificia Universidad Catolica in Lima, Peru.
Professor Virginia Zavala obtained her Ph.D. in Sociolinguistics at Georgetown University. Her research interests revolve around the way language use constructs power relationships and subjectivities, especially in the educational context and in multilingual scenarios. […Read more]

How to Retract an Article in the Humanities

Date: Wed. March 25th, 2015, 12:00 pm-1:30 pm
Location: Clark Hall Room 206, 11130 Bellflower Road

YoYoImage

A Baker-Nord Digital Humanities Event
 
There are significant differences between the kind of support that humanists typically provide for their arguments, on the one hand, and the kind of support scientists provide for their arguments, on the other. The standard mode of support in the humanities makes it nearly impossible to imagine circumstances in which the retraction of a publication was warranted, whereas this is routine in science.
The possibility of retraction is not peculiar to science. […Read more]

Making, Mining, Marking and Mashing: The Digital Humanities Curriculum in 2025

Date: Wed. March 25th, 2015, 4:30 pm-6:00 pm
Location: Clark Hall Room 206, 11130 Bellflower Road

LennonWall

A Baker-Nord Digital Humanities Event

Mills Kelly, Professor of History at George Mason University, will challenge the audience to think about what the humanities curriculum will look like ten years hence. How will advances in digital media change the ways that students learn about and make sense of the humanities, and how should humanities departments begin changing their curricula to prepare students for advanced thinking about the big ideas in the humanities?
Free and open to the public.   […Read more]

An Afternoon with Patricia Harman

Date: Fri. March 27th, 2015, 12:00 pm-1:30 pm
Location: Clark Hall Room 206, 11130 Bellflower Road

MidwifeofHopeRiver


Best-selling author Patricia Harman will read from and discuss her latest book, The Reluctant Midwife, the story of a young nurse-midwife in West Virginia during the Great Depression. Harman, a certified nurse-midwife, is a former faculty member of Case Western Reserve University’s Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing.
An informal lunch with be served.
Free and open to the public.  Registration recommended. 
 
 
 

About the speaker:

Patricia Harman, […Read more]

Funk, Flight and Freedom in 140: A Love Letter to #Black Twitter

Date: Wed. April 1st, 2015, 4:30 pm-6:00 pm
Location: Clark Hall Room 309, 11130 Bellflower Road

Adam Banks, Associate Professor of Writing, Rhetoric, and Digital Media at the University of Kentucky, will discuss his interdisciplinary research exploring connections among race theory, music, history, digital humanities, and rhetoric. His most recent work investigates links between African American rhetorical traditions and 21st century technologies.
Free and open to the public.  Registration recommended. 

 
About the Speaker:
Born and raised in Cleveland, Ohio, and educated in the Cleveland Public Schools, Adam Banks received his BA in English from Cleveland State University, […Read more]