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Past Events

Event Date Summary
God and the Big Bang: Discovering Harmony between Science and Spirituality Fri. April 28th, 2017
11:45 am-1:45 pm

Mysticism and science: What do they have in common? How can one enlighten the other? By drawing on modern cosmology and ancient Kabbalah, Matt shows how science and religion can together enrich our spiritual awareness and help us recover a sense of wonder and find our place in the universe. …Read more.

Faculty Work-in-Progress: The Modernization of Knowledge Tue. April 25th, 2017
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

In his talk, Chris Haufe, Assistant Professor in the Department of Philosophy, compares the individual and community-level practices that have contributed to the growth of scientific knowledge with those that were historically important to the growth of Islamic law and legal theory. …Read more.

2017 Joseph and Violet Magyar Lecture in Hungarian Studies: Television and the Politics of Nostalgia in Hungary and Eastern Europe Thu. April 20th, 2017
5:00 pm-6:00 pm

In her lecture, Aniko Imre, Professor and Chair of the Division of Cinema and Media Studies at the University of Southern California, provides an overview of how television functioned in Hungary and, more broadly, in the Soviet-controlled region as a medium at the cross-section of the public and domestic spheres, between top-down attempts at political control and bottom-up demands for entertainment and consumption. …Read more.

A Community Conversation About Libraries: Moving From Present to Future Wed. April 19th, 2017
4:00 pm-5:00 pm

This event is a “Soul of Cleveland” dialog.
As demographics, technology, and forms of information dissemination constantly change, libraries of all types must continually adapt to new user behaviors and expectations, and do so within limited resources.  …Read more.

The Color of Creation and the Creation of Color: Making Art in Ancient Egypt Wed. April 12th, 2017
5:30 pm-6:30 pm

For the ancient Egyptians nothing existed before creation except a dark expanse of endless water. With the creation of the cosmos came light and color. In this talk Gay Robins, Samuel Candler Dobbs Professor of Art History at Emory University, explores the ways in which the Egyptians used color to represent their ideas about the created world, its divine inhabitants, and the king who ruled on earth as the sun god’s representative. …Read more.

Jews and Jazz: Improvising Ethnicity – A Talk with Charles Hersch Thu. April 6th, 2017
5:00 pm-6:00 pm

Music has been an important vehicle for ethnic groups to assert and explore their identities. In his new book Jews and Jazz: Improvising Ethnicity, Professor Hersch looks at how Jewish musicians have used jazz to construct three kinds of identities: to become more American, to emphasize their minority outsider status, and to assert their Jewishness. …Read more.

Building Bridges: Fixing the Immigration Issue and Strengthening U.S.-Mexico Relations Mon. April 3rd, 2017
5:00 pm-6:00 pm

2017 CLEVELAND HUMANITIES FESTIVAL: IMMIGRATION
SEATING CAPACITY FOR THE VENUE HAS BEEN FILLED. REGISTRATION FOR THIS EVENT IS NOW CLOSED.
Immigration reform has long been a priority for President Vicente Fox, who, during his time in office, worked with then-President George W. …Read more.

When Away Becomes Home: The Refugee Crisis and Opportunities for Welcome in Northeast Ohio Fri. March 31st, 2017
12:00 pm-1:00 pm

2017 CLEVELAND HUMANITIES FESTIVAL: IMMIGRATION
The world is in the midst of the worst refugee crisis since World War II. Several organizations in Northeast Ohio are actively engaged in resettling individuals and families who have fled from their homelands. …Read more.

Lady Mary’s Legacy: Vaccine Advocacy from The Turkish Embassy Letters to Video Games Thu. March 30th, 2017
6:00 pm-7:00 pm

2017 CLEVELAND HUMANITIES FESTIVAL: IMMIGRATION
On April 1, 1717, Lady Mary Wortley Montagu wrote her famous “Letter to a Friend” from the Turkish Embassy, describing the process of smallpox inoculation. …Read more.

Film Screening and Discussion – I Learn America: One High School, One School Year, Five New Americans Wed. March 29th, 2017
4:30 pm-7:00 pm

2017 CLEVELAND HUMANITIES FESTIVAL: IMMIGRATION
In America, nearly one student in four is a child of immigration. How America fares in welcoming immigrants will determine our identity for the years to come. …Read more.

Who Should Enter the Golden Door: American Immigration Policy in Historical Perspective Wed. March 29th, 2017
12:00 pm-1:00 pm

2017 CLEVELAND HUMANITIES FESTIVAL: IMMIGRATION

Click HERE to view the recording of this lecture.
The current debate about immigration often neglects or misinterprets past “policies” that have related to immigration and citizenship in the United States. …Read more.

Internal Immigration and Return: Jewish Renaissance in Sicily and Sardinia Tue. March 28th, 2017
12:00 pm-1:00 pm

2017 CLEVELAND HUMANITIES FESTIVAL: IMMIGRATION
The infamous 1492 Edict of Expulsion of the Jews forced close to 500,000 people into exile. Many had to leave their home-country where they lived for centuries, but still many, with nowhere to go, were pressured into conversion and into what became their “internal immigration.”
Travel with Irene Shaland to the islands of Sicily and Sardinia that present a fascinating chapter in both, the history of immigration and the history of Jewish Diaspora. …Read more.

Muslim in America: A Conversation with Ayad Akhtar Mon. March 27th, 2017
5:00 pm-6:00 pm

2017 CLEVELAND HUMANITIES FESTIVAL: IMMIGRATION
Pulitzer Prize winning playwright Ayad Akhtar discusses the Muslim experience in America with Justine Howe, Assistant Professor in the Department of Religious Studies. Akhtar is the author of American Dervish, published in over twenty languages worldwide and a 2012 Best Book of the Year at Kirkus Reviews, Toronto’s Globe and Mail, Shelf-Awareness, and O (Oprah) Magazine. …Read more.

A Polish Doctor in the Nazi Camps: My Mother’s Memories of Imprisonment, Immigration, and a Life Remade Fri. March 24th, 2017
12:00 pm-1:00 pm

2017 CLEVELAND HUMANITIES FESTIVAL: IMMIGRATION
REGISTRATION FOR THIS EVENT IS CLOSED. Please email: bakernord@case.edu to be placed on the waiting list.
In her talk, author and anthropologist Barbara Rylko-Bauer will use her mother’s story to talk about broader issues of immigration, examining the echoes from the past that are appearing today.  …Read more.

Imagination and Diaspora in Peter Balakian’s Poetry and Prose Fri. March 24th, 2017
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

2017 CLEVELAND HUMANITIES FESTIVAL: IMMIGRATION
Peter Balakian, Pulitzer-prize winning Armenian American poet and writer and the Donald M. and Constance H. Rebar Professor of Humanities at Colgate University, will discuss the impact of the post genocide Armenian diaspora in his poetry and his memoir Black Dog of Fate…Read more.

Ancestry Thu. March 23rd, 2017
6:00 pm-7:00 pm

2017 CLEVELAND HUMANITIES FESTIVAL: IMMIGRATION
Henry Louis Gates Jr.’s presents the F. Joseph Callahan Distinguished Lecture, which is also the keynote address for the Baker-Nord Center for the Humanities’ contributions to the Cleveland Humanities Festival. …Read more.

Graduate Student Work-in-Progress – Bioaffect, Medical Memoir, and the Making of a Physician Tue. March 7th, 2017
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

Medical students and physicians in the US are routinely rhetorically positioned as subjects who lack empathy. By examining memoirs that medical students produce about their time in medical school and essay collections written about physicians and empathy, Melissa Pompili, a PhD candidate in the Department of English, identifies the cultural forces at work behind this positioning in order to illuminate how the humanities can bring the physician’s own conception of self into the conversation about the humanity of medical encounters. …Read more.

Platonic Properties Thu. March 2nd, 2017
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

Plato’s Theory of Forms has mostly been conceived by his later readers as a theory of universals or properties: that is, its primary aim is to explain the application of a single expression to distinct entities; or to explain relations of similarity among them. …Read more.

Humanities@Work: Practical Advice from Human Resources Directors Fri. February 24th, 2017
12:00 pm-1:00 pm

Panelists will discuss how they consider applicants with humanities degrees, how applicants can best explain their skills, and will give humanities students practical advice on resumes, cover letters, and other aspects of the job/internship search from an HR perspective. …Read more.

Faculty Work-in-Progress – The Big Sale: Elk Hills, the Energy Crisis, and the Invention of the Neoliberal Market, 1969-1998 Tue. February 21st, 2017
4:30 pm-5:30 pm


In his talk, Peter Shulman, Associate Professor in the Department of History, will discuss the Elk Hills Naval Petroleum Reserve. In the middle of the 20th century, the most valuable piece of federal property was California’s Elk Hills Naval Petroleum Reserve, set aside decades before to provide oil for the military in future emergencies. …Read more.

Humanities@Work: Politics – A Conversation with Senator Sherrod Brown Mon. February 20th, 2017
5:00 pm-6:00 pm


Please join Ohio’s senior United States Senator Sherrod Brown for a conversation about how studying the humanities prepared him for a career in public service.
Senator Brown majored in the humanities before going on to serve his community in the Ohio House of Representatives, and to serve Ohio as Secretary of State. …Read more.

Graduate Student Work-in-Progress – Expanding the Closed Loop: Industrial Conservation, Recycling, and Environmentalism in the United States Tue. February 14th, 2017
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

Contemporary solid waste recycling did not simply arise from the countercultural environmentalism of the late 1960s and 1970s. In this talk, Jon Corey Hazlett, a PhD candidate in the Department of History, explores the historical connections of recycling to conservation efforts developed and promoted by a variety of industries from the 1930s through the 1950s. …Read more.

Film Screening and Discussion – Paul Laurence Dunbar: Beyond the Mask Thu. February 9th, 2017
5:00 pm-8:00 pm

This documentary looks at the life and legacy of Paul Laurence Dunbar, the first African American to achieve national fame as a writer. Born to former slaves in Dayton, Ohio, Paul Laurence Dunbar (1872-1906), is best remembered for his poem, “We Wear The Mask” and for lines from “Sympathy” that became the title of Maya Angelou’s autobiography “I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings.” Dunbar’s story is also the story of the African American experience around the turn of the century. …Read more.

Career Opportunities and Resume Writing for Humanities Majors Fri. February 3rd, 2017
12:00 pm-1:00 pm


Click HERE for the PowerPoint presented at this event.
The recently expanded Humanities@Work program connects CWRU humanities students with corporate, government, nonprofit, and other partners through community discussions, networking events, and paid career opportunities (internship, practicum, etc.) . …Read more.

2017 Baker-Nord Distinguished Faculty Lecture : The Sauroktonos (Lizard-Slayer) from Praxiteles to Charles Ray Wed. February 1st, 2017
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

Click HERE to view this event.
In 2004 the Cleveland Museum of Art acquired a rare ancient bronze statue of the type known as Apollo the Lizard-Slayer. …Read more.

Humanities@Work: Media Mon. January 30th, 2017
6:00 pm-7:00 pm

Panelists discuss how studying the humanities influenced their careers and answer questions from the audience. Panelists include:
Carlo Wolff (Boston University ’68) majored in English. He contributes news stories and features to the Cleveland Jewish News and writes book reviews for the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette and music reviews for DownBeat. …Read more.


Page last modified: July 17, 2017