Baker-Nord Center for the Humanities

Navigation + Search
Home / Events /

Past Events

Event Date Summary
Wonder Woman Symposium Fri. September 23rd, 2016
3:00 pm-5:00 pm

Babes in Arms
During World War ll, when the young men left their jobs to fight overseas, women took their places: in the factories, driving trucks and buses, building and flying planes — and in comics.  …Read more.

Religion and Secularism across the Humanities: An Interdisciplinary Forum Wed. May 6th, 2015
2:00 pm-4:00 pm

A Baker-Nord Working Group Event
 

Over the past decade, numerous disciplines in the humanities and social sciences have spoken of a “religious turn.” This pattern is characterized by a resurgent interest in interdisciplinary scholarship that revaluates central questions about the relationship between religion and secularism in the academy and in our objects of study. …Read more.

Literature, Sexuality, and the Postsecular: Intersections and Possibilities – A Workshop Wed. April 29th, 2015
11:00 am-12:00 pm

What is “the postsecular,” and why should it matter to the study of literature and sexuality? Exploring various possible answers, this workshop emphasizes the significance of recent debates in secularization theory to scholarly analyses of non-normative and transnational representations of sexual subjectivities. …Read more.

Who Started World War I? Centenary Debates about War Guilt and Meaning Wed. April 15th, 2015
4:30 pm-6:00 pm

A Niagara of new histories has greeted the centenary of the outbreak of World War I, and none more impressive or widely-read than Christopher Clark, Sleepwalkers: How Europe Went to War in 1914 (Harper, 2013). …Read more.

Reading Interfaces: Inquiries at the Intersection of Literature and Technology Fri. April 10th, 2015
11:00 am-5:00 pm

A Baker-Nord Digital Humanities Event
Curated by Kristine Kelly and Allison Schifani

Free and open to the public, registration recommended. 
Electronic literature presents and generates literary performances that display, question, and critique ways of reading and modes of literary production in the digital age. …Read more.

Reading Interfaces: Inquiries at the Intersection of Literature and Technology Thu. April 9th, 2015
12:00 pm-7:00 pm

A Baker-Nord Digital Humanities Event
Curated by Kristine Kelly and Allison Schifani

Free and open to the public, registration recommended. 
Electronic literature presents and generates literary performances that display, question, and critique ways of reading and modes of literary production in the digital age. …Read more.

The Joseph and Violet Magyar Lecture in Hungarian Studies: Counter-Constitutions: How a 21st Century Constitutional Revolution in Hungary Claimed Medieval Roots Thu. April 9th, 2015
4:30 pm-6:00 pm

Since independence in 1989, nationalist Hungarians have argued that the Holy Crown of St. Stephen and associated doctrines should be at the core of Hungary’s constitution. Kim Lane Scheppele – Rockefeller Professor of Sociology and International Affairs at Princeton University – will discuss how the Crown is both a literal object given by the Pope to the first Christian king of Hungary, in the year 1000 and – since medieval times – a key symbolic touchstone in the constitution of state power. …Read more.

Reading Interfaces: Inquiries at the Intersection of Literature and Technology Wed. April 8th, 2015
4:00 pm-7:30 pm

A Baker-Nord Digital Humanities Event
Curated by Kristine Kelly and Allison Schifani

Free and open to the public, registration recommended. 
Electronic literature presents and generates literary performances that display, question, and critique ways of reading and modes of literary production in the digital age. …Read more.

Talking Back to the Book: Critical Digital Literacies in African American Rhetorical Traditions Wed. April 1st, 2015
4:30 pm-6:00 pm

In this talk, Adam Banks, Professor of Writing Rhetoric and Digital Studies at the University of Kentucky, will consider Stevie Wonder’s exploration of technologies in his pursuit of artistic independence from Motown in the early 1970s as an invocation and deployment of the Talking Book, a trope of literacy for freedom emerging from Black oral traditions.   …Read more.

An Afternoon with Patricia Harman Fri. March 27th, 2015
12:00 pm-1:30 pm


Best-selling author Patricia Harman will read from and discuss her latest book, The Reluctant Midwife, the story of a young nurse-midwife in West Virginia during the Great Depression. Harman, a certified nurse-midwife, is a former faculty member of Case Western Reserve University’s Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing. …Read more.

How to Retract an Article in the Humanities Wed. March 25th, 2015
12:00 pm-1:30 pm

A Baker-Nord Digital Humanities Event
 
There are significant differences between the kind of support that humanists typically provide for their arguments, on the one hand, and the kind of support scientists provide for their arguments, on the other. …Read more.

Making, Mining, Marking and Mashing: The Digital Humanities Curriculum in 2025 Wed. March 25th, 2015
4:30 pm-6:00 pm

A Baker-Nord Digital Humanities Event

Mills Kelly, Professor of History at George Mason University, will challenge the audience to think about what the humanities curriculum will look like ten years hence. …Read more.

Faculty Work-in-Progress: Eteocles in the Hermeneutic Circle Mon. March 16th, 2015
4:30 pm-6:00 pm

Sophocles’ tragedy Oedipus the King is well-known. Few, however, know that Aeschylus wrote a dramatic trilogy about the family of Oedipus. Aeschylus’s The Seven against Thebes, the only surviving play from the trilogy, deals with Oedipus’ son Eteocles, who defends Thebes from an army of attackers led by his own brother Polyneices. …Read more.

On Not Reading David Foster Wallace Fri. March 6th, 2015
3:00 pm-4:00 pm

There are over fifty thousand novels published in the United States every year. Readers, reviewers, and scholars talk a lot about why one might read certain books; in this talk, Amy Hungerford, Professor of English at Yale University, asks how we decide, and how we talk about, what not to read in the context of literary over-production. …Read more.

The Long Now of Digital Humanities Thu. March 5th, 2015
4:30 pm-6:00 pm

A Baker-Nord Digital Humanities Event
 
 

Digital Humanities has been called “the culture of the perpetual prototype.” The fast pace of technological change makes it challenging to plan for the long-term future of digital projects, and yet a flourishing culture of digital scholarship demands that we balance the need for innovation against the need for stability and longevity. …Read more.

Introduction to Text Encoding with TEI Wed. March 4th, 2015
9:00 am-5:00 pm

A Baker-Nord Digital Humanities Event
 
The Workshop will run 4-6 March 2015. Participants should plan to attend all three days.
This event has ended.

This three-day workshop is designed for individuals who are contemplating embarking on a text-encoding project, or for those who would like to better understand the philosophy, theory, and practicalities of encoding in XML (Extensible Markup Language) using the Text Encoding Initiative (TEI) Guidelines. …Read more.

Neoliberal Practices and Cultural Production in Latin America in the Past 40 Years Fri. February 27th, 2015
5:00 pm-6:30 pm

PLEASE NOTE NEW LOCATION!
Idelber Avelar – a professor specializing in contemporary Latin American fiction, literary theory, and Cultural Studies at Tulane University – will address the effects of neoliberal practices in the production of culture, the transformation of state economies into transnational flow of goods, and how both of these factors have worked to position the discourse of memory as a new cultural and economic commodity. …Read more.

Freedman Fellows: Tornado Destruction & Financial Damage to Homeowners Wed. February 25th, 2015
12:00 pm-1:30 pm


A Digital Humanities Event
 
Dr. Gallagher will discuss his research, as well as the challenges it has presented and how the Freedman Fellows program provided both solutions and support. …Read more.

The Issa Lecture: Interspecies Ethics Tue. February 24th, 2015
4:30 pm-6:00 pm

Cynthia Willett, a Professor in the Department of Philosophy at Emory University, draws upon animal studies and relational ethics to propose transpecies ideals of communitarianism and cosmopolitan peace. Expanding our understanding of human and animal capacities begins with appreciating the capacity in ourselves and other animals for wonder and acts of moral beauty. …Read more.

Faculty Work-in-Progress: Honoring the Prophet, Performing American Islam Wed. February 18th, 2015
12:00 pm-1:30 pm

For centuries, Muslims have performed mawlids, or festivals and celebrations in honor of the Prophet Muhammad. These rituals came under attack in the twentieth-century, critiqued as either harmful innovations from early Islamic models or as superstitious practices incompatible with modernity. …Read more.

The Story of the Cleveland Play House Mon. February 16th, 2015
5:30 pm-8:00 pm


Founded in 1915, the Cleveland Play House remains the longest-running professional theatre in the country, but its history has never been studied by anyone outside of the institution itself. …Read more.

Chemistry in Art, Art in Chemistry, and the Spiritual Ground They Share Thu. February 12th, 2015
4:30 pm-6:00 pm


After looking at the evolution of pigments for the color blue, Roald Hoffmann – Frank H. T. Rhodes Professor of Humane Letters Emeritus at Cornell University and recipient of the 1981 Nobel Prize in Chemistry – will discuss how scientific articles relating to chemistry also deal with representation of an underlying reality, and face questions that are essentially artistic. …Read more.

Issues on 20th and 21st Century Art Wed. February 11th, 2015
5:00 pm-6:00 pm

Anuradha Vikram is a curator, critic, and educator, currently Director of Residency Programs at 18th Street Arts Center, in Santa Monica, CA. From her pedagogical and curatorial experience, Vikram will expand on the productive intersections of Art as Research, Arts as Engagement, and Art as Politics. …Read more.

Freedman Fellows Presentation: Tibet Oral History and Archive Project Wed. February 11th, 2015
12:00 pm-1:30 pm


A Digital Humanities Event
 
Dr. Goldstein will discuss his research, as well as the challenges it has presented and how the Freedman Fellows program provided both solutions and support. …Read more.

“Rockwell Kent” Screening and Discussion Mon. February 9th, 2015
5:00 pm-8:30 pm

Artist and social activist Rockwell Kent produced haunting landscapes inspired by his adventures in Alaska, Tierra del Fuego, and Greenland. For more than ten years, producer/writer Frederick Lewis, associate professor in the School of Media Arts and Studies at Ohio University, retraced the nomadic artist’s many travels, shooting footage in Greenland, Newfoundland, Alaska, Ireland, and Russia to produce this film, which documents how Kent’s travel experiences inspired his artistic work. …Read more.

Animating the War: The First World War and the History of Animation Thu. February 5th, 2015
4:30 pm-6:00 pm


The history of animation dates back to the 1890s, yet the medium as we know it was deeply shaped by the events of the First World War. In this talk, Donna Kornhaber – Assistant Professor of English at the University of Texas at Austin and author of numerous articles on the history of animation and the book Charlie Chaplin, Director – explores the role that the Great War played in the modern development of animation in terms of its subject matter, style, humor, and relationship to violence. …Read more.

Second Look Film Series: My Architect Mon. January 26th, 2015
6:00 pm-8:00 pm

This Oscar-nominated documentary features director Nathaniel Kahn searching to understand his father, noted architect Louis Kahn, who died bankrupt and alone in 1974. He explores his father’s past, interviewing architects such as Frank O. …Read more.

Humanities Graduate Student Happy Hour Thu. January 22nd, 2015
5:00 pm-7:00 pm

All Case Western Reserve University Graduate Students are invited to attend the first Baker-Nord Center Humanities Graduate Student Happy Hour.  Please join us for some snacks, a drink or two, and a chance to meet and network with graduate students from all of the CWRU humanities departments. …Read more.

Blackboard as a Digital Pedagogical Tool Thu. January 8th, 2015
9:00 am-12:00 pm

Free and open to the public, registration recommended. 

 
This essential workshop will explore tactics to effectively use Blackboard for teaching. In addition to offering participants a broad overview of the platform’s capacities, this workshop will provide hands on training in its use. …Read more.


Page last modified: January 7, 2015