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Peter Knox (Director)


Peter Knox is the Eric and Jane Nord Family Professor of the Humanities, Professor of Classics, and the Director of the Baker-Nord Center for the Humanities.

He teaches a wide range of courses in Greek and Latin literature, as well as on topics in Roman culture, ancient epic and classical reception, using sources in translation.

Peter’s research interests focus primarily on Latin poetry and Greek poetry of the Hellenistic period, and he has published over a hundred articles and reviews on a wide range of subjects within those areas.

His books include Ovid’s Metamorphoses and the Traditions of Augustan Poetry (1986); Ovid, Heroides: Select Epistles (1995);Oxford Readings in Ovid (2006); and A Companion to Ovid (2009). Most recently he published The Oxford Anthology of Roman Literature (2013) in collaboration with J. C. McKeown, with whom he is also working on a companion anthology of Greek literature.

His other projects include an edition of the Greek and Latin poetry of Angelo Poliziano, forthcoming in the I Tatti Renaissance Library, and a new edition of Ovid’s Metamorphoses for the Loeb Classical Library.

He has served as the Editor of The Classical Journal and is a Past President of the Classical Association of the Middle West and South.

Brian J. Clites (Associate Director)


Brian Clites studies the anthropology of power, violence, and trauma within contemporary Roman Catholicism, as well as broader issues of gender, pain, and suffering within marginalized communities in the United States. His work draws upon multiple fields within the humanities, including religious studies, history, philosophy, and cultural anthropology. He joined the Department of Religious Studies in Fall 2017, shortly after completing his doctorate at Northwestern University.

Brian is currently finishing his first book, Breaking the Silence, an ethnography of survivors of priestly sexual abuse. Examined through the history of three generations of Chicago Catholics, the book unearths the local traditions of religious activism that later enabled these survivors to transform their suffering into such a robust agenda of political and ecclesiogical reforms.His research has been supported by grants from the American Catholic Historical Association and the Cushwa Center for American Catholicism at the University of Notre Dame.

Prior to arriving at Case Western Reserve, Brian taught at Northwestern University, the University of Chicago, and John Carroll University. His offerings have included a range of courses on topics within Catholic Studies, American Religious History, and Theory and Method.





Susanne Vees-Gulani (Associate Director)


Vees-GulaniSusanne Vees-Gulani is Associate Professor of German and Comparative Literature in the Department of Modern Languages and Literatures and Co-Director for the Max Kade Center for German Studies.  She received her Ph.D. in Comparative Literature from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and joined CWRU in 2006.

Her research focuses on 20th and 21st Century German literature and culture, the Second World War, postwar reconstruction and identity formation, trauma and memory studies, and science and literature. She is the author of Trauma and Guilt: Literature of Wartime Bombing in Germany (2003) and co-editor of Generational Shifts in Contemporary German Culture (2010). She is currently co-editing a special issue of the journal Seminar on “Representations of German War Experiences from the Eighteenth Century to the Present” (February 2014). Recent publications also include articles on Dieter Forte, W. G. Sebald, and Durs Grünbein, the rebuilding efforts in the city of Dresden, as well as the pictorial history of Dresden.

For 2010-2011, Dr. Vees-Gulani was awarded a National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowship to work on her book project about the origins and manifestations of the German victim discourse surrounding Dresden. She has also been a Freedman Fellow at CWRU (2012-2013) for her project to visualize digitally a network of relationships and factors informing the Dresden memory culture.

Maggie Kaminski (Administrative Director)



Maggie Kaminski is an alumna, having received her master of non-profit organizations degree at CWRU. She has worked in various capacities at CWRU, including over ten years of service in the School of Medicine’s development office where she was director of alumni affairs and friends programs, director of leadership programs, and a consultant in matters related to the capital campaign for the Cleveland Health Sciences Library as well as the Amici Medicinae (Friends of Medicine) program. She has been with the Baker-Nord Center since March 2007.




Page last modified: January 17, 2018